Monthly Archives: December 2015

Net metering for electricity: fair practices

Among climate activists, so-called “net metering” has become a popular cause. Allowing operators of small, nonpolluting generators to export surplus power into local power networks and earn credits at the same rates as the usual electricity prices will help promote those generators, they contend. However, such a practice will also help enrich the owners of those generators.

Costs of service: If retail electricity were priced in the same way Brookline prices water, there might be few problems with net metering. Brookline’s water rates apply combinations of demand charges and usage charges. Demand charges vary with the capacities of connections to the water network and pay costs to maintain the network. Usage charges vary with the metered uses of water and wholesale water prices.

If retail electricity were priced similarly, operators of small, nonpolluting generators would pay demand charges based on capacities of their connections and could use the connections either to import or to export power. When they import power, they would accrue charges that depend on amounts used and on wholesale costs of power at points of use. When they export power, they would accrue credits at the same rates.

Such a practice could allocate costs of service fairly. Customers would pay to maintain local power networks in proportion to capacities of their connections, whether used for import or export. Customers who operate small, nonpolluting generators and export electricity to other customers would earn credits at the same rates as prices of conventionally generated power they displace, as figured at the points of use.

Retail billing: Many industrial and some commercial electricity customers are already covered by billing divided into demand and usage charges, but most residential customers are not. Instead, residential electricity rates usually lump costs of maintaining local power networks together with costs of wholesale electricity and long-distance electricity transport.

A residential electricity customer typically sees a single, composite billing rate applied to amounts of electricity used. If residential customers are allowed to export electricity at the same composite billing rate, credits they receive offset not only costs of electricity but also costs to maintain local power networks. Over time, such an approach to billing means that their shares of costs to maintain local networks will be paid by other customers attached to the networks.

Fair practices: Most subsidies to small, nonpolluting generators flow from the general economy through tax collections, which distribute the burdens partly on the basis of ability to pay. Burdens produced by net metering flow against those principles and tend to benefit people with higher incomes at the expense of people with lower incomes. The small, nonpolluting generators are largely owned by people with higher incomes, who can better afford major investments that they require.

As long as amounts of electricity generated by small, nonpolluting generators remain relatively minor, burdens of unfair billing from net metering also remain minor. As these generators become more common, unfair burdens grow apace. The more fortunate few, with higher incomes, tax the many less fortunate, with lower incomes, forcing them to pay excess shares of maintaining local power networks.

If net metering of electricity is to be expanded–while defending a just society–then fair practices need to be applied in retail billing for electricity. Residential electricity bills need to be separated into accurately assessed demand charges and usage charges, as Brookline water billing now does. Net metering needs to apply the rates for usage charges. Climate action can support social justice.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, December 21, 2015


Eddie Ahn, ed., Social justice groups advocate expansion of solar through net metering, Brightline Defense Project (San Francisco, CA), March 9, 2015

Matthew C. Whitaker (professor of history, Arizona State University), Net metering and its potential impact on low-income consumers, Atlanta Blackstar (Atlanta, GA), July 2, 2014

Diversity Commission: police and fire department report

A regular meeting of the Diversity, Inclusion and Community Relations Commission on Wednesday, December 16, started at 6:30 pm in the Denny Room at the Brookline Health Center. The agenda, mostly a series of reports from working committees, gave little hint of fireworks to be set off.

Consultant report: A consultant engaged by the Board of Selectmen has submitted a report on workforce diversity and related issues in Brookline’s police and fire departments, and the report has been distributed to the commissioners. Under agenda item 9, Bernard Greene, a member of the Board of Selectmen who regularly attends commission meetings, was to lead a discussion.

A major impetus to the report has been the dispute involving a Brookline firefighter who has been on extended leave, following a racially charged incident starting with an alleged insult by a supervisor. That was also an influence for organizing the commission.

Town management and members of the Board of Selectmen opted to abolish the former Human Relations Commission and set up a new group that would be excluded from most issues involving town workers. After a long series of reviews, they accomplished the goal under Article 10 at the annual town meeting of 2014.

Complaints: The commission’s review of the police and fire report was punctuated by comments from the public–notably from two police officers. According to them, the department has been afflicted with racial tensions. Unlike the departments of forty and fifty years ago, today’s Brookline Police Department includes several minority and women officers, although senior leadership are white men.

One officer, who was recorded on video later distributed to the public, said he had worked in the Police Department “for about three years now, and as a black man I don’t feel safe working in this town. I’ve had racial comments said to me from the supervisor, from fellow patrolmen–and I just don’t feel safe here.”

Another officer, also recorded on video later distributed to the public, said, “I’ve been a police officer in Brookline for [over 16 years]. On December 4, I was in a marked cruiser in uniform and pulled up to a member of the Brookline Police command staff to speak with him. What he said to me when I rolled the window down was basically, ‘Pull your car up on the sidewalk or on the corner, go up on the sidewalk and do some ni***r jumping jacks for me, and I’ll put in a good word for you.’”

The Brookline Police Department has attracted sharp criticism from both residents and visitors to the town, receiving a poor Internet rating. Brief excerpts from recent comments indicate some typical complaints:

From a visitor: “I know someone who was arrested for an unpaid speeding ticket…In the squad car, he overheard two officers making inappropriate racial & linguistic comments about people who had immigrated to the US.”

From a resident: “The cops are racist, I’ve been followed plenty of times, stared at like I’m committing a crime, and harassed. I love being followed while I drive down the street to my house by a cop car so they can check and see if I’m driving a stolen car….”

From a visitor: “The Brookline Police function primarily as an extortion racket. They are claiming that I have an unpaid parking ticket from *ten years* ago, and my license has now expired because I couldn’t renew it. Trying to pay this ticket has been a Kafkaesque nightmare….”

Commission duties: The Diversity, Inclusion and Community Relations Commission looks to have plenty of work ahead. Although left without a major role in labor issues of the town’s workforce, it has responsibilities to investigate and report discrimination and bias incidents in Brookline. According to Article 3.14 of the general bylaws of Brookline, revised as of June 2, 2014:

3.14.1 …The Purpose of the Commission and the goal of the Town shall be to strive for a community characterized by the values of inclusion…justice in a community requires, at a minimum, monitoring and enforcing civil rights laws as they apply to all persons who come in contact with the Town…regardless of their race, color, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, age, religion, creed, ancestry, national origin, military or veteran status, genetic information, marital status, receipt of public benefits (including housing subsidies), or family status…herein, “Brookline Protected Classes”….

3.14.3(A)(viii)(3) …the Commission…shall have the following responsibilities:…Receive complaints, according to procedures developed by the Commission and as approved by the [Board of Selectmen], and initiate preliminary review of the facts, without drawing any legal conclusions, from any person who comes in contact with the Town, concerning allegations of discrimination or bias against a member of a Brookline Protected Class. The Commission shall also have the authority, in its discretion, to…Present any results of preliminary review of the alleged facts to the Town Administrator and/or the Board of Selectmen, in an appropriate case, for action….

– Beacon staff, Brookline, MA, December 20, 2015


Diversity, Inclusion and Community Relations Commission, Agenda for December 16, 2015

Brooks Ames, Brookline Justice League filed class action lawsuit to put an end to racial subordination in Brookline, plus other posts, Twitter, December 2-20, 2015

General bylaws, Town of Brookline, MA, as of May 26, 2015

Civil rights lawsuit: town and individuals accused, Brookline Beacon, December 14, 2015

Board of Selectmen: firefighter Gerald Alston, Jr., speaking, Brookline Beacon, December 6, 2014

Annual town meeting: human relations, regulations and zoning, Brookline Beacon, May 31, 2014

Human Relations Youth Resources Commission: Coping with changes, Brookline Beacon, April 24, 2014

Civil rights lawsuit: town and individuals accused

The Board of Selectmen scheduled a special, closed session to start at 5:00 pm on Tuesday, December 15, well in advance of a regular meeting starting a 7:30 pm. The purpose, generally lawful for a closed session, is litigation strategy. In a departure from usual practice, the board’s agenda specifies the focus: a civil rights lawsuit recently filed against the Town of Brookline and others, including individuals.

Gerald Alston, a Brookline firefighter who has been on extended leave, began disputes with the Town of Brookline more than five years ago, after his supervisor allegedly made an insulting comment that was recorded in a telephone message. The case has gone from an internal report to a complaint filed with a state agency, to a suit filed in a state superior court and most recently to a federal civil rights suit.

Parties: Mr. Alston’s civil right lawsuit was filed Tuesday, December 1 by Brooks A. Ames, a Brookline lawyer whose wife, Mariela Ames, is a Precinct 15 town meeting member. It is directed at the town, at the Board of Selectmen, at an employee union, at two town employees and at six Brookline residents who are or have been involved with town government–as follows (from official court records):
• Defendant, Town of Brookline
• Defendant, Board of Selectmen of the Town of Brookline
• Defendant, Betsy DeWitt, In her Individual and Official Capacities
• Defendant, Ken Goldstein, In her [sic] Individual and Official Capacities
• Defendant, Nancy Daly, In her Individual and Official Capacities
• Defendant, Jesse Mermell, In her Individual and Official Capacities
• Defendant, Stanley Spiegel
• Defendant, Sandra DeBow, In her Individual and Official Capacities
• Defendant, Joslin Murphy, In her Individual and Official Capacities
• Defendant, Local 950, International Association of Firefighters
• Defendant, Neil Wishinsky, In his Individual and Official Capacities
• Assigned to: Judge George A. OToole, Jr.
• Cause: 42: 1983 Civil Rights Act

Ms. DeWitt, Mr. Goldstein and Ms. Mermell were members of the Board of Selectmen during some of the events alleged in the complaint filed in federal district court. Ms. Daly and Mr. Wishinsky are current members of the Board of Selectmen. Dr. Spiegel is a Precinct 2 town meeting member and a member of the Advisory Committee. Ms. Murphy is the town counsel. Ms. DeBow, now Ms. DeBow-Huang, is director of the town’s Human Resources office. Local 950 represents Brookline’s firefighters in collective bargaining and labor disputes.

Court filing and allegations: Mr. Alston’s court filing alleges that the Town of Brookline has a longstanding pattern of racial injustice in labor practices. [Court filing, paragraph 1]

“He brings this case on behalf of himself and all others who have been damaged by Brookline’s longstanding and well-established policy, custom and practice of opposing racial equality, enforcing racial subordination, engaging in affirmative action and favoritism towards white residents and employees, and retaliating against persons who protest racial discrimination.” [Court filing, paragraph 1]

Mr. Alston’s court filing alleges the insult that it says began a sequence of disputes occurred when his supervisor in 2010 “was upset that Mr. Alston had gone out on an injury leave.” It says that the former supervisor had believed, “without any evidence or basis in fact, that Mr. Alston had faked an injury.” The injury in 2010 was confirmed by medical records, it claims. [Court filing, paragraphs 2 and 77]

After Mr. Alston wrote a report about the incident, the court filing says, “Brookline took no action except to inform [the former supervisor] that Mr. Alston had made a complaint.” Afterward, the court filing claims, “Brookline’s Board of Selectmen protected [the former supervisor] from any adverse consequences, pursuant to policy.” [Court filing, paragraph 5]

The remainder of the 55-page court filing recounts a perverse litany of protests and rebuffs that it says illustrates a longstanding pattern of racial injustice in labor practices. For example, it claims that “Brookline fought to prevent the civil rights commission charged with enforcing the Town’s bylaw against racial discrimination from fulfilling its charge to investigate and resolve complaints.” [Court filing, paragraph 12]

“The Town of Brookline’s policy of disregarding the Fourteenth Amendment [due process and equal protection] is enforced by the Brookline Board of Selectmen through their agents in the Town administration, including but not limited to the office of town counsel, the town administrator, the department of human resources and other town department heads. The Town of Brookline’s policy is also enforced by the town moderator, town meeting, the school committee and the superintendent.” [Court filing, paragraph 32]

The former Human Relations/Youth Resources Commission was disbanded through actions at the 2014 annual town meeting under Article 10. A replacement group created under that article is called the Diversity, Inclusion and Community Relations Commission. There is a correspondingly named town department. Unlike the former commission, the current commission lacks authority to investigate labor complaints such as Mr. Alston’s.

In the course of working through administrative channels, the court filing alleges that Mr. Alston met with resistance, saying, “While the investigation was ongoing, the Town pressured Mr. Alston to agree to drop his complaint…Mr. Alston told the director that he wanted the Town to follow its policies. The human resources director called Mr. Alston an ‘asshole’ and hung up on him.” [Court filing, paragraph 87]

“Several years later…based on public pressure, the Town relented and placed Mr. Alston on a paid administrative leave. That paid leave has now extended for nine months and constitutes an acknowledgment by the Town that the Town’s racially hostile environment is the fundamental obstacle to his safe return to work. [Court filing, paragraph 100]

In the court filing, Mr. Alston is seeking from the U.S. District Court for Massachusetts a declaration “that the Defendants violated the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution.” He also seeks “damages sufficient to compensate Plaintiff, in an amount to be proven at trial” and punitive damages. The filing seeks class action certification and “a reparations fund for persons harmed by the Town’s policy.” [Court filing, Relief Requested]

– Beacon staff, Brookline, MA, December 14, 2015


Complaint and jury demand, Gerald Alston v. Town of Brookline, et al., case 1:15-cv-13987, U.S. District Court for Massachusetts, filed December 1, 2015 (1 MB, as obtained from court records)

Agenda, Board of Selectmen, Town of Brookline, MA, for December 15, 2015

Cases of interest, U.S. District Court for Massachusetts (PACER registration needed for docket access)

Public Access to Court Electronic Records (PACER), United States Courts

Brock Parker, Brookline firefighter sues town over alleged racial slur, Boston Globe, August 30, 2013

Human Relations Youth Resources Commission: Coping with changes, Brookline Beacon, April 24, 2014

Board of Selectmen: firefighter Gerald Alston, Jr., speaking, Brookline Beacon, December 6, 2014

Board of Selectmen: marijuana dispensary license

A regular meeting of the Board of Selectmen on Tuesday, December 8, started at 6:00 pm in the sixth-floor meeting room at Town Hall. The early start left ample time for a final hearing on the registered medical marijuana dispensary being proposed at 160 Washington St. in Brookline Village–the intersection with Boylston St. (Route 9).

Minutes: Neil Wishinsky, the board’s chair, announced that minutes of closed sessions that were held this year on January 20, May 12, June 9 and September 8 will be released. They all concerned “real property,” a lawful topic for a closed session. The session on January 20 was described as reviewing a “lease agreement.” The ones on June 9 and September 8 were held jointly with the School Committee.

The four sets of minutes were not online as of December 12 but are available on request. Under the state’s open meeting law and regulations, the board must release minutes of closed sessions when the matters are finished and the reasons for confidentiality no longer apply. In practice, the board has reviewed and released minutes of closed sessions only on request. There are hundreds of closed meetings with unreleased minutes.

Marijuana dispensary: A long review of a registered dispensary for medical marijuana is nearing an end. Voters approved medical marijuana in the fall of 2012. A town meeting authorized zoning and local licensing in the fall of 2013. The next year, New England Treatment Access (NETA) filed for a zoning permit, reviewed by the Zoning Board of Appeals, and a local license, reviewed by the Board of Selectmen.

After exploring a potential site near the corner of Beacon St. and Summit Ave., NETA negotiated an agreement for the currently proposed site in Brookline Village. In December, 2014, the town’s Licensing Review Committee began a series of five public meetings and one public hearing. The Zoning Board of Appeals held a hearing April 23 of this year and granted a zoning permit.

The NETA proposal to use the former Brookline Savings Bank building at 160 Washington St. attracted strong neighborhood protest. Opponents filed an article for the fall town meeting last year, seeking zoning changes that would have struck out the former Savings Bank building as a potential site. They lost 60-146, in an electronically recorded vote.

The Licensing Review Committee developed a fairly stringent set of recommended license conditions, completed last April. On April 25, the Board of Selectmen adopted general regulations for registered marijuana dispensaries, based on those committee recommendations.

Until May, the committee was headed by Betsy DeWitt and Kenneth Goldstein, former members of the Board of Selectmen. They did not run for new terms and were replaced by Nancy Heller and Bernard Greene. The Licensing Review Committee’s findings are advisory; the Board of Selectmen is not obliged to follow them.

Headwinds: Signs of dissent emerged last month. As a regular meeting Tuesday, November 3, the Board of Selectmen was to discuss “the process for reviewing the application” from NETA for a local license. As minutes of the meeting show, the discussion soon veered from process into substance. Mr. Wishinsky suggested that any license be for a “trial period.” Board member Ben Franco questioned sales of edible products containing marijuana.

Nancy Daly, now in her tenth year on the board, called for monitoring “excessive prescriptions.” She did not say how that might be achieved but did propose several added conditions on a license for the proposed medical marijuana dispensary. They included:
• No walk-in business, service by appointment only
• A maximum number of appointments per hour
• On-site dispensing limited to 20 percent of state limits
• Home deliveries for balances of sales above local limits
• Hours of operation 10 am to 7 pm except noon to 5 pm Sunday

So far, the board is not known to have proposed similar limits on local businesses that sell other medical products. Although medical marijuana has not been identified as a significant cause of death in the United States, most pharmacies stock prescription drugs involved in a long, horrible trend of U.S. drug deaths.

U.S. drug deaths, 1999 through 2014

CdcDrugDeathDate1999to2014
Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contrary to many, uninformed news reports, rapidly rising deaths from drug use are not a recent trend. Data from the federal government that span 15 years show major growth in drug deaths of U.S. residents over that entire period. Prescription drugs–not black-market drugs–caused an average of about two-thirds of those drug deaths. Currently, the U.S. rate of drug deaths exceeds the U.S. rate of deaths from motor vehicles. Prescription drugs are responsible for about 60 percent of current U.S. drug deaths.

Public hearing: The board’s public hearing on a local license continued for over two hours but produced little that had not previously emerged from several related hearings held this year and last year. Those occurred at the Licensing Review Committee, the Advisory Committee on Public Health, the Planning Board, the Zoning Board of Appeals, the Zoning Bylaw Committee and the Advisory Committee and its subcommittees.

Following its November 3 meeting, the Board of Selectmen released an unsigned document titled “Proposed conditions for a registered marijuana dispensary license (2015-11-20 Draft)”. Footnotes tell who on the board proposed some of the conditions but give no explanations. At the hearing, Amanda Rossitano, who has been named manager of NETA’s Brookline dispensary, objected.

The NETA dispensary now operating in Northampton, Ms. Rossitano contended, has had no problems that might justify added license restrictions. She objected to proposals for business by appointment only, for an on-site sales limit lower than the state limit and for home delivery requirements applied to larger sales.

Mr. Wishinsky, the board’s chair, asked for a police report. Mark Morgan, a deputy superintendent, responded: “No traffic or police issues experienced in Salem, Brockton or Northampton”–three of the four communities with dispensaries now operating. The board spent substantial time questioning pharmaceutical properties and testing of products, although it lacks jurisdiction in those areas.

Frank Smizik, state representative for Precincts 2-4 and 6-13, testified in support of a local license. “NETA is a competent company,” he said. “Amanda Rossitano helped lead my office for several years.” Mr. Smizik stated he “does not support additional purchase limits” as license conditions.

Several other Brookline residents and former residents supported a license for NETA, with some objecting to added license restrictions. They included Anne Braudy of Linden Ct., Richard Brauley of Pond Ave., Fred Levitan of Beacon St., Linda Olson Pehlke of Browne St., Ronna Benjamin of Newton, Dr. Peter Moyer of Walnut St., Dr. Jordan Tishler of Loveland Rd. and Dr. Mark Eisenberg of Monmouth St.

Brookline opponents included Gordon Bennett of Davis Ave., Andrew Olins of Walnut St., George Vien of Davis Ave. and Dr. Elizabeth Childs of Walnut St. Some supported added restrictions, and all opposed the proposed site on Washington St. However, Dr. Cornelia “Kea” van der Ziel of Wolcott Rd. said the location is “as good a site as we can get in the town” and pointed out that “home delivery is not an option for some people.” The Board of Selectmen will review the hearing and reach a decision at a later meeting.

– Beacon staff, Brookline, MA, December 12, 2015


Causes of drug deaths, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February, 2015

Tracey Michienzi, Draft conditions from Licensing Review Committee, April 8, 2015

Regulations, registered marijuana dispensary, Town of Brookline, MA, April 24, 2015

Minutes, Board of Selectmen, Town of Brookline, MA, November 3, 2015

Unsigned, Draft conditions, from current Board of Selectmen, November 20, 2015

Zoning Board of Appeals: zoning permit for a registered marijuana dispensary, Brookline Beacon, April 25, 2015

Licensing Review Committee: registered marijuana dispensary, Brookline Beacon, January 29, 2015

Fall town meeting: bylaw changes, no new limits on marijuana dispensaries, Brookline Beacon, November 18, 2014

2014 fall town meeting: electronic voting, Brookline Beacon, November 27, 2014

Craig Bolon, Medical marijuana in Brookline: will there be a site?, Brookline, Beacon, December 7, 2014

Craig Bolon, Open meetings in government: groping toward transparency, Brookline Beacon, August 10, 2014

Craig Bolon, Override Study Committee: Open Meeting Law problems, Brookline Beacon, August 7, 2014

Town meeting: parks and schools

Warm controversies at this year’s fall town meeting cooled quickly in a flurry of surprises and compromises. In the afternoon before the first session on Tuesday, November 17, town staff learned that Brookline was no longer in line for a major state grant to assist with Larz Anderson Park. We are too rich a town to qualify.

Article 6: Rejection of the state grant application quashed a dispute over Article 6 on the town meeting warrant, seeking matching funds to improve Larz Anderson Park. To qualify for up to $400,000 in additional state aid, the town meeting would have to restrict Larz Anderson to recreation and conservation uses only, invoking Article 97 of the Massachusetts constitution.

A few weeks earlier, consultants hired by the Board of Selectmen had named Larz Anderson as a potential site for a new elementary school. The 1949 will of Isabella Weld Anderson, leaving the land to the town, required that it be used for educational, recreational or charitable purposes. Agreeing to the state’s conditions would abandon potential uses involving two of those three categories. The town meeting took no action.

Political chatter also started to call out Larz Anderson as a potential site for high-school expansion. Never mind that the park is remote from centers of population and not well served by streets and transit. Park, recreation and conservation enthusiasts sounded flustered, to say the least.

Open space: Over the past 150 years, since the Civil War, the town acquired about 475 acres of usable open space–not counting the traffic islands and cemeteries. The 53 major sites, totaling about three-quarters of a square mile, represent about 11 percent of the town. Only about a tenth of that space is part of school sites. The rest provides recreation facilities, pedestrian parks and conservation areas.

The distribution of usable, public open space became grossly unequal. Each precinct in the town has nearly the same population. However, Precinct 15 has 257 acres of usable, public open space–over half the total. The average amount of usable, public open space is only about 30 acres per precinct. Precincts 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 have less than 10 acres each. Precinct 13, snaking along the Brighton line, has none.

 

Brookline’s usable, public open space

Year Acres Precinct Source Site name
2011 10.0 14 purchase Fisher Hill Reservoir Park
1977 1.6 1 taking Amory Woods Conservation Area
1975 3.5 1 taking Halls Pond Conservation Area
1972 0.5 4 purchase Billy Ward Playground
1970 4.2 5 purchase Lincoln School Playground
1967 0.4 5 taking Juniper Street Playground
1961 25.0 16 bequest Blakely Hoar Conservation Area
1961 1.1 9 purchase Lawton Playground
1960 9.5 15 purchase Soule Center
1953 17.2 15 purchase Dane Park
1951 2.4 7 purchase Pierce School Playground
1948 61.1 15 bequest Larz Anderson Park
1946 1.1 12 purchase Schick Park
1945 30.2 15 purchase Lost Pond Conservation Area
1945 15.2 15 purchase Skyline Park
1944 11.1 14 purchase Warren Field
1941 1.3 15 purchase Baldwin School Playground
1939 2.4 5 donation Robinson Playground
1935 11.3 16 donation Baker School Playground
1915 0.5 4 purchase Murphy Playground
1914 8.7 5 purchase Downes Field
1913 0.8 14 purchase Eliot Little Field Park
1913 1.7 5 purchase Clark Playground
1910 4.0 11 purchase Driscoll School Playground
1907 2.1 6 purchase Emerson Garden
1907 119.9 15 purchase Putterham Meadows Golf Course
1905 1.7 9 purchase Coolidge Playground
1903 8.3 1 purchase Amory Playground
1903 3.1 12 purchase Runkle School Playground
1902 32.2 14 donation Brookline Reservoir Park
1902 2.6 1 donation Longwood Mall
1902 2.8 1 donation Knyvet Square
1902 1.1 1 donation Mason Square
1902 1.9 2 purchase Winthrop Square
1902 6.5 14 purchase Heath School Playground
1901 5.6 14 purchase Waldstein Playground
1901 0.3 5 purchase Philbrick Square
1901 3.3 10 donation Griggs Park
1900 13.8 1,3 purchase Riverway Park
1900 4.2 11 purchase Corey Hill Park
1899 0.3 4 donation Linden Park
1897 0.4 10 donation Saint Mark’s Square
1895 0.2 4 donation Linden Square
1894 12.9 4,5 purchase Olmsted Park
1891 6.7 8 purchase Devotion School Playground
1891 5.0 3 purchase Longwood Playground
1890 2.8 15 purchase Singletree Hill Reservoir
1871 4.1 4 purchase Brookline Avenue Playground
1871 5.2 6 purchase Cypress Street Playground
1871 2.0 4 purchase Town Hall Square
1868 1.2 6 purchase Boylston Street Playground
1864 0.2 1 purchase Monmouth Street Park
1827 0.2 5 donation Town Green

Source: Open space plan, Town of Brookline, MA, January, 2011

 

Social justice: Surely Precinct 15–with its giant legacy of usable, public open space–can spare a little for a school site. There are at least three obvious, well qualified candidates:

• Putterham Meadows Golf Course, at 120 acres–a conspicuous luxury. Five acres carved from a corner of this cradle of riches would capably house a three-section elementary school.

• Soule Recreation Center, at 10 acres, a site perennially looking for a gainful occupation. Its rapid churn of personnel has become a community scandal.

• Dane Park, at 17 acres, by far the least used of Brookline’s major parks.

The town has not commissioned a new school site since Baker in 1935. The new Lincoln School, opened in 1994, took over the old, private Park School site–after that school moved away to Goddard Ave. It would take a coldly rigid, greedy set of park, recreation and conservation enthusiasts to find that there is no adequate space they could possibly spare from Precinct 15.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, December 4, 2015


Open Space Plan, Town of Brookline, MA, January, 2011 (8 MB, uses obsolete precinct numbers)

Precinct Map, Town of Brookline, MA, February, 2012 (1 MB)

Craig Bolon, School building wonder: mishegoss from moxie, Brookline Beacon, October 25, 2015

Advisory Committee: don’t lock up town land, Brookline Beacon, October 3, 2015