Monthly Archives: November 2016

After a disaster: confining Chernobyl

In the spring of 1986, toward the end of the Soviet empire, disaster erupted at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant near Pripyat, Ukraine, located along a river bank a few miles from the southern border of the Soviet Republic of Byelorussia (now the Republic of Belarus). Soviet managers had continued to build potentially unstable graphite-moderated RBMK reactors, long after the U.S. and other advanced countries abandoned the technologies. Compounding their mismanagement, Soviet agencies approved building large power reactors without secure, heavy enclosures.

The positive void-coefficient of the RBMK design is prone to runaway power surges, and the graphite components readily burn in air. The main advantage of the technologies, which mattered for early programs to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons, had been that they could operate with natural, unenriched uranium.

The Chernobyl disaster resulted from rogue testing of an accident-recovery procedure, aiming to measure responses to system failures. Plans for testing, using Unit 4 at the Chernobyl plant, had been proposed by plant engineers but never submitted to Soviet regulators. Because the plans called for deliberately disabling safety systems, regulators would probably have intervened had they known.

Disaster strikes: The testing was performed during the midnight shift early on April 26, 1986, by young, inexperienced reactor operators, after most plant engineers went home. Erratic maneuvers by the operators put the reactor into a highly unstable condition.

An enormous power spike overwhelmed the partly disabled safety systems, causing the reactor’s water coolant to flash into steam and explode. The two-million-pound cover of the steel reactor vessel blew into the lightly built roof of the reactor building, shattering walls and exposing fuel rods and graphite components to the atmosphere.

Chernobyl Unit 4 shattered, May, 1986

chernobylunit4remains1986may
Source: Ministry of Nuclear Energy, USSR

That led to a swift temperature surge. Reactor core materials caught fire, burning out-of-control for hours. Multiple explosions occurred, fed by steam and hydrogen. After burial in millions of pounds of sand and chemicals dropped from helicopters over a few days, remains of the reactor core smoldered for about a month.

Two technicians directly exposed to the initial explosion died at the scene of the disaster. Aleksandr Akimov and Anatoly Baranov, a senior operator and senior engineer on duty at the time, died several days later from radiation exposure. Thousands of rescue workers and salvage workers called “liquidators” who were exposed to intense radiation suffered, and many died from radiation effects over the following years, although few were tracked. More than 300,000 residents of the area were relocated.

Soviet officials tried to ignore the severity of the incident, finally outlining a disaster almost two days after the initial explosion. They and some of their successors after the end of the Soviet empire have never acknowledged the heavy burden of delayed sickness and death. Outside the Soviet empire, concealment failed. Less than 24 hours after the initial explosion, nuclear researchers working in Denmark described a reactor meltdown. A day later, U.S. satellite photos showed massive destruction at the site.

Winds quickly carried fumes and particles into eastern Europe, Scandinavia and then western Europe. Strong, airborne radioactivity appeared within a week in Albania, Austria, Belgium, Britain, Bulgaria, Byelorussia, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine and Yugoslavia. Within a month, radioactivity from the disaster had been detected worldwide. Testing and mitigation efforts are likely to continue in Europe for generations.

Covering up a disaster scene: In a half year after the disaster, Soviet workers buried the Chernobyl disaster site in a makeshift of steel beams, concrete and metal panels. The unstable, so-called “sarcophagus,” loosely assembled from about four million pounds of materials, was not expected to last more than 30 years.

Following over 15 years of negotiation, planning, design and construction, this fall a large, so-called New Safe Confinement structure, costing about $1.5 billion, has been mounted over the Chernobyl “sarcophagus” assembled in 1986. After the disintegration of the Soviet empire, there was no coherent government left to salvage Chernobyl. Most of the burdens of the confinement project are borne by countries of the European Union, who remain at high risk from further site degradation and spread of radioactivity.

Despite its name, there is nothing entirely “safe” about the newly installed confinement. Experience at the Fukushima nuclear-disaster site in Japan shows that the intense levels of radioactivity inside it can degrade electrical mechanisms and robotic systems the confinement houses and polymers used to protect structural steel against rust. The confinement structure is rated to withstand an F1 tornado, but a stronger one could warp and might collapse it.

The mechanisms and robotics were intended to allow recovery and permanent disposal of the Chernobyl Unit 4 ruins. However, so far no detailed plans have been published for such a project, which would probably take decades, and no funds are available to carry it out. There is no known safe repository for the debris, some of which will remain strongly radioactive for at least hundreds of years and hazardous to health for up to a million years.

A substantial fraction of the reactor’s final inventory of radioactivity remains in soils and water bodies of the surrounding Chernobyl “exclusion zone”–about 1,000 square miles. No substantial remediation has been performed; none is currently planned. Trees and other plants have been allowed to grow unmanaged, absorbing radioactivity from soils. A wildfire could spread another Chernobyl radiation disaster throughout Europe.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, November 30, 2016


John Wendle, Chernobyl’s radioactive ruins get a new tomb, National Geographic, 2016

New Safe Confinement, Chernobyl Shelter Fund, European Bank, 2016 (technical description, 2 MB)

Chernobyl accident 1986, World Nuclear Association, 2016 (brief summary)

A. Artmann, G. Pretzsch and V. Krasnov, Radioecological problems in connection with the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany), Eurosafe Forum, 2016

Madhi Rageb, Chernobyl accident, University of Illinois (Urbana), 2015

Inside the sargophagus, Chernobyl Gallery (UK), 2015 (recent photos)

Gerd Ludwig, The long shadow of Chernobyl, Gerd Ludwig Photography (Los Angeles, CA), 2014

Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 2013 (brief summary)

Dirk Bannink and Henk van der Keur, Chronology of the Chernobyl disaster, Nuclear Information & Resource Service (Netherlands), 2011

W. Robert Johnston, Chernobyl reactor accident 1986, L-3 Comunications Systems, 2006

Alexey Yablokov, et al., The Chernobyl catastrophe: consequences for human health, Greenpeace (Netherlands), 2006

Bill Keller, Chernobyl plant being mismanaged Pravda charges, New York Times, April 25, 1988

Report on the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station, NUREG-1250, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1987 (poor quality reproduction)

Robert Gillette, Evidence mounts of high-level Soviet lapse in Chernobyl alert, Los Angeles Times, June 20, 1986

Soviets admit nuclear accident, British Broadcasting Corporation (UK), April 28, 1986

Serge Schemann, Soviet announces nuclear accident at electric plant, New York Times, April 26, 1986

Craig Bolon, Losing steam: U.S. nuclear power-plants, Brookline Beacon, September 27, 2015

Obama’s legacy: tracking hate crimes

Electing an African-American as U.S. President in 2008 capped centuries of bigotry and began a legacy of inclusion. An image of Obama taking the oath of office became a picture worth a billion words. Despite all the flapping from Europe and Asia about peace and tolerance, so far nothing comparable happened there. For example, there has been no Franco-Arab president of France–not even someone mentioned or on the horizon.

A quiet message, the obverse of promoting inclusion, was delegitimizing racial and ethnic hate. From growing up with bigotry, signs are easily remembered–serving as sly handshakes through words and acts that signal shared outlooks: “one of the gang.” Electing a black President, then re-electing him to another term said, “No, that’s not OK any more. That’s not us.”

Lynching and race riots grew in the aftermath of the Civil War and continued into the 1940s. The way of inclusion became an official outlook through the Great Depression, the era of World War II and the landmark Brown v. Board decision from the Supreme Court in 1954. That did not make it the common way of life. Hate crimes against African-Americans surged during civil rights struggles of the 1950s through the 1970s.

Tracking hate crimes: The U.S. Department of Justice finally began to record hate crimes in 1992, as required by the Hate Crime Statistics Act of 1990 and the Arson Prevention Act of 1996. [Public Laws 101-275 and 104-155] About 17,000 law enforcement agencies now contribute to annual reports. Records since 1996 are available online as part of Uniform Crime Reports compiled by FBI central offices. However, the Justice Department does not publish trends and has not tried to provide consistent reporting.

Anti-African-American hate crimes

usantiblackhatecrimes2009thru2015
Source: U.S. Department of Justice, 2016

Data from the U.S. Department of Justice show that the most numerous reported hate crimes target African-Americans, Jews and Muslims. For 2015, recent hate crime data show about 1,750 incidents targeting African-Americans, about 660 targeting Jews and about 260 targeting Muslims.

Anti-Jewish hate crimes

usantijewishhatecrimes2009thru2015
Source: U.S. Department of Justice, 2016

The most recent U.S. population survey for race and ethnicity estimates 43 million African-Americans. The most recent survey for religion estimates about 6 million Jews and 3 million Muslims. Proportionately, the 2015 rates of hate crimes per million residents were about 40 targeting African-Americans, 110 targeting Jews and 90 targeting Muslims.

Anti-Muslim hate crimes

usantimuslimhatecrimes2009thru2015
Source: U.S. Department of Justice, 2016

Crime trends: Hate crime statistics reflect crime motives as reported by law enforcement agencies–not as determined by courts or as found by other third parties. They are affected by reporting bias. If, for example, law-enforcement training increased likelihoods that incidents were flagged as hate crimes, then rates of reported hate crimes would rise, but such increases would reflect training rather than changes in crime rates.

The falling rates of reported hate crimes targeting African-Americans, down about 20 percent for the five years from 2010 to 2015, signal apparent progress during core years of the Obama administration. There was similar apparent progress in lower rates of reported hate crimes targeting Jews, falling about 25 percent over that five-year span.

However, reported hate crimes targeting Muslims increased significantly, about 60 percent over those years. All of that increase occurred during the final year, 2015. Not shown in the foregoing charts, a sustained and even greater increase occurred in reported hate crimes targeting Native Americans. They tripled between 2010 and 2013, then remained nearly steady at the increased rate.

Situations of Native Americans might be so different from those of other groups for reported rates to be largely fictions. On the basis of hundreds of interviews, Barbara Perry, a professor of criminology at the Ontario Institute of Technology, estimated in 2008 that hate crimes targeting Native Americans had been drastically under-reported. A sharp rise in reported rates between 2010 and 2013 could stem from reporting improvements during the Obama administration. Ken Salazar, Interior secretary during those years, promoted policies of inclusion toward Native Americans. So far no systematic survey has addressed the issues.

Causes and consequences: Filth spread by Donald J. Trump’s campaign for President acted to relegitimize and encourage racist behavior, starting in 2015. Trump did not need to “be” a racist or an anti-Semite but just to become a fellow traveler. His race-baiting dog whistles drew poisonous support from Nazi, Klan and other white supremacist groups. He circulated some of their propaganda. There is an obvious precedent. Former President Wilson also drew support from racist groups. The first Southerner elected since Taylor in 1848, he resegregated parts of the federal workforce, notably the Post Office.

Just as Wilson’s attitude and behavior encouraged lynching and growth of the Ku Klux Klan, vile propaganda emerging around the Trump campaign probably encouraged recent hate crimes–notably against Muslims, whom Trump savaged. People with antisocial outlooks and violent bents are apt to find signs of acceptance and perhaps approval. Unless Donald J. Trump were somehow to reverse his ways and become a beacon of tolerance, we can expect a parade of moral cretins and their crimes to surge in future years.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, November 18, 2016


Errin Haines Whack, Associated Press, Trump’s staff picks alarm minorities: ‘injustice to America’, U.S. News, November 18, 2016

Hate crime statistics for 2015, U.S. Department of Justice, November 11, 2016

Adrian Walker, The politics of hatred and resentment seem headed for defeat, Boston Globe, November 7, 2016

Dana Milbank, Anti-Semitism is no longer an undertone of Trump’s campaign. It’s the melody, Washington Post, November 7, 2016

Trump closes his campaign as he opened it: preaching xenophobia and hate, Daily Kos (UK), November 7, 2016

Michael Finnegan, Trump stokes terrorism fears, citing refugee ‘disaster’ in Minnesota, Los Angeles Times, November 6, 2016

Sarah Posner and David Neiwert, How Trump took hate groups mainstream, Mother Jones, October 14, 2016

Stephanie McCrummen, Finally: someone who thinks like me, Washington Post, October 1, 2016

Daniel Marans, Meet members of Donald Trump’s white supremacist fan club, Huffington Post, August 25, 2015

Martin Pengelly, American Nazi Party leader sees ‘a real opportunity’ with a Trump Presidency, Manchester Guardian (UK), August 7, 2016

Emily Flitter, Reuters, Trump tweet that blasts Clinton as corrupt includes the Star of David, Washington Post, July 2, 2016

Tom Shoop, When Woodrow Wilson segregated the federal workforce, Government Executive (Washington, DC), November 20, 2015

William Keylor, The long-forgotten racial attitudes and policies of Woodrow Wilson, Boston University Office of Public Relations, March 4, 2013

Population statistics, Bureau of the Census, U.S. Department of Commerce, 2016

Gregory Smith, et al., America’s changing religious landscape, Pew Research Center, 2015

Barbara Perry, Silent Victims: Hate Crimes Against Native Americans, University of Arizona Press, 2008

Brown v. Board of Education, Leadership Conference (Washington, DC), 2004

Robert A. Gibson, The Negro Holocaust: Lynching and Race Riots in the United States, Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute, 1979

Craig Bolon, Election aftermath: recovery starting, work pending, Brookline Beacon, November 9, 2016

Craig Bolon, Chump disease: political virus, Brookline Beacon, October 2, 2016

Election aftermath: recovery starting, work pending

In a column titled, “Politics of hatred and resentment seem headed for defeat,” Adrian Walker, a writer at the Boston Globe, claimed that the 2016 election involved “the ugliest and strangest Presidential campaign of modern times.” Actually, this year was neither notably ugly nor notably strange for a campaign, either in “modern times” or in historical ones.

The 1968 contest was vile–at the nadir of the Vietnam War–leaving the socially conscious voters without a general-election candidate to support. The main alternative to the pro-war candidates from both major parties was George Wallace, a coarse, violently racist former governor of Alabama who got about 14 percent of the votes. However, early and middle nineteenth century–in the era of slavery–saw far more vicious campaigns than that.

Instead of such modern and historical extremes, this year there was simply one notably ugly Presidential candidate. To our vexation, he won. At best, a Long Night of Nixon–like the one starting in 1968–begins again. We have a President-elect whose lack of character has not been seen since Buchanan in 1856 and Polk in 1844–and whose lack of competence and stature has never been seen before.

To the last day of the campaign, Hillary Clinton’s message remained inclusive: “Stronger together.” Donald J. Trump’s message remained divisive: “Crooked Hillary.” Clinton closed her campaign with rallies featuring President Obama, his wife Michelle, the Clinton family, prominent entertainers and other major figures from politics. Trump closed his campaign much as he had opened it, largely isolated, spouting lies and hate.

The outcome from the 2016 election for President exhibited classic racial voting, strongly coupled to sexist bias. Over 24,500 exit poll responses were reported by Edison Research to the Associated Press, television news networks and the New York Times–made available online by Cable Network News–from which the following table shows a small but telling example, extracted and rearranged for readability. Majorities of both white men and white women voted for Donald J. Trump. Majorities of all other groups voted for Hillary Clinton.


Voting for President in 2016 by race and age
 
Race.and.age..(Pct)….Clinton….Trump…..Other
Whites.18-29.(12%)…….43%…….48%……..9%
Whites.30-44.(17%)…….37%…….55%……..8%
Whites.45-64.(30%)…….34%…….63%……..3%
Whites.65-up.(13%)…….39%…….58%……..3%
Blacks.18-29…(3%)…….83%………9%………8%
Blacks.30-44…(4%)…….87%………7%………6%
Blacks.45-64…(5%)…….90%………9%………1%
Blacks.65.up…(1%)…….90%………9%………1%
Latino.18-29…(2%)…….70%…….24%………6%
Latino.30-44…(3%)…….71%…….22%………7%
Latino.45-64…(3%)…….67%…….29%………4%
Latino.65-up…(1%)…….71%…….24%………5%
Others.18-up…(6%)…….60%…….34%………6%
 
Source: Edison Research via Cable News Network

Chump disease: For readers who followed Donald J. Trump over a career of around 50 years in real estate, he was not strange at all–just greedy and vulgar. Some might remember an arrogant young man, a mediocre new college grad who apparently could not land a real job on his own. Instead, he went to work for his dad, helping to rent out his dad’s apartments.

His first brush with government proved chilling; it foreshadowed his career path. In 1973, he was accused of refusing to rent apartments to African-Americans–a violation of the federal Fair Housing Act of 1970. Instead of mending his ways, Donald J. Trump employed Roy Cohn–a former hired gun for Richard Nixon and J. Edgar Hoover. That attack strategy failed; Trump was forced into a settlement agreement. However, attack strategies settled into Trump’s character; he became known as a business bully.

After a fatuous tangle with casino properties in Atlantic City, Donald J. Trump courted ruin as mismanaged properties lurched to bankruptcy, following the sharp recession of 1991. Facing competition from Connecticut he could not counter, he chiseled his way out by loading losses onto lenders, investors and contractors and avoiding taxes, counting some of their losses as though they had been his losses. Then he discovered a second calling as a media rube. He became known as a sick hustler.

Pending work: There would have been tons of work for a Hillary Clinton administration–starting with investigation of FBI director James Brien “Jim” Comey, Jr.–who in effect acted as a Trump booster while a government employee. Comey’s stunts threw the election. Polling trends up to the stunt on October 28 showed clearly that Hillary Clinton would otherwise have won. One-percent margins in Pennsylvania and Florida, for example, would have landed in the other direction.

Nevertheless, on election day there remained severe problems to solve in domestic programs, notably in Health and Human Services, Education, Interior and Transportation. Chronic Congressional paralysis would likely have taken far more effort than executive agencies, because it springs from voter choices for members of Congress. Most and maybe all that work will probably wait at least another four years, unless Donald J. Trump were to stumble enough to be impeached and convicted.

If nothing more, the effects from Donald J. Trump’s dog-whistle rants showed large segments of U.S. voters may be happy to back candidates who come across as sleazebags, xenophobes, anti-Semites, sexists, racists, Nazi fellow-travelers, political whores and traitors. A recent Washington Post headline put it, “Finally: someone who thinks like me.” Were Trump cheerleaders off their rockers? A more recent Post article cited evidence suggesting many of them were over their heads in debt.

This year, millions of U.S. citizens have been denied a right to vote. David Leonhardt, writing in the New York Times, argued that systematic efforts by reactionary Republicans to swing elections in their favor are the main causes. Corruption is rankest in the Deep South and the Southwest. It also threatens voters in parts of the Midwest. Some of the arrogant rubes behind it Trumpet their motives. Leonhardt quoted one from North Carolina claiming that throttling early voting was “in the best interest of the Republican Party.”

We do not know what Hillary Clinton might have promised high-income sponsors who put up most of around $1 billion she was able to attract in support of her campaign. An early promise by Donald J. Trump to “self fund” his campaign turned out to be just another casual lie from him. Despite the threats emerging from the Citizens United case in 2013, big money–including early big money–proved less effective than many feared it would be. Former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida had the most early big money, yet he was an early loser.

New business: A new item of business–so far skipped by most mainstream media in the United States–is a federal lawsuit against Donald J. Trump. It was filed on September 30, 2016, in the District of Southern New York. It accuses him and an alleged collaborator of child rapes and murder threats. Trump, the co-defendant and their lawyers have sought to dismiss accusations as lies and smears. Jon Swaine, a reporter for the Guardian in Britain, treated an earlier version of the lawsuit as a media circus.

In the recent federal lawsuit, Donald J. Trump and Jeffrey E. Epstein, of New York, are accused of raping a 13-year-old girl in 1994, and both are accused of threatening to have her whole family killed if the girl were to “say anything” about it. With the filings in federal court, the lawsuit seeks to override statutes of limitation. Thomas Meagher of Princeton, New Jersey, the attorney of record, is a patent lawyer–his firm’s chief litigator and managing partner when the recent federal lawsuit was filed.

According to an Internet news article published this past summer, Donald J. Trump’s co-defendant Jeffrey E. Epstein has been classified in New York as “a Level 3 registered sex offender–the most dangerous kind.” The author of that article is a lawyer in California who focuses on tort and divorce cases and who has identified herself as assisting the plaintiff in the recent federal lawsuit.

In an exhibit filed with the complaint against Donald J. Trump, the plaintiff provided a sworn statement saying that “Defendant Trump tied me to a bed,…and then proceeded to forcibly rape me…violently striking me in the face with his open hand and screaming that he would do whatever he wanted.” She further states, “Immediately following this rape, Defendant Trump threatened me that, were I ever to reveal any of the details of Defendant Trump’s sexual and physical abuse of me, my family and I would be physically harmed if not killed.”

Unusual with incidents of violent sexual abuse, the complaint against Donald J. Trump in the lawsuit also provided a sworn statement from a claimed eyewitness to the alleged rapes. It states that she “personally witnessed the Plaintiff being forced to perform various sexual acts with Donald J. Trump and Mr. Epstein. Both Mr. Trump and Mr. Epstein were advised that she was 13 years old.” It further states the claimed eyewitness “personally witnessed Mr. Trump…[and]…Mr. Epstein physically threaten the life and well-being of the Plaintiff if she ever revealed any details of the physical and sexual abuse….”

Donald J. Trump and the co-defendant are presumed innocent unless proven to be at fault. According to the New York Daily News, the next step in the recent federal lawsuit is a court conference set for December 16. One might suspect, however, that a difficult case–now against a President-elect–could be withdrawn.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, November 9, 2016


Note: As was obvious to us on November 8, election day, by November 12 the Hillary Clinton campaign also found that the publicity stunt on October 28 by James Brien “Jim” Comey, Jr., the FBI director, had thrown the election–wrecking the growing Clinton advantage seen in earlier polls. Comey rehashed Clinton’s use of a private e-mail server while Secretary of State, in a letter sent to eight Congressional committee chairs–all Republicans. That was immediately forwarded to news organizations from one or more of those offices. Starting the next day, polls showed declining margins of support for Clinton. By election day, margins had not recovered.

Comey’s FBI staff in New York had found there was an e-mail cache on a computer seized from ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner, the estranged husband of Huma Abedin, a key assistant to Hillary Clinton. As of October 28, the FBI did not have a search warrant to examine the computer and could not legally have known the content of e-mails stored on it. Longstanding Department of Justice policy forbids disclosure of information close to elections, and Comey had recently been reminded about that policy.

News stories soon surfaced that Comey’s October 28 stunt had been engineered by FBI staff in New York City and disclosed to Rudy Giuliani, the former city mayor who had become a key backer of Donald J. Trump. For several days before October 28, in comment sections of major news sites, well known Trump trolls had been feverishly writing comments seeking to persuade readers not to use early voting and suggesting that some major news was in the works. On November 7, Comey was celebrated at an event held by a group of longstanding Trump supporters. [note added November 13, 2016]

Anne Gearan, Washington Post, Hillary Clinton blames Comey letter for stopping her momentum, Boston Globe, November 12, 2016

K.K. Rebecca Lai, Alicia Parlapiano, Jeremy White and Karen Yourish, How Trump won the election according to exit polls, New York Times, November 9, 2016 (updated, with charts)

David Leonhardt, The real voter fraud, New York Times, November 8, 2016

Adrian Walker, The politics of hatred and resentment seem headed for defeat, Boston Globe, November 7, 2016

Dana Milbank, Anti-Semitism is no longer an undertone of Trump’s campaign. It’s the melody, Washington Post, November 7, 2016

Josh Lederman, Associated Press, As campaign closes, the Obamas pass the torch to Clinton, U.S. News, November 7, 2016

Trump closes his campaign as he opened it: preaching xenophobia and hate, Daily Kos (UK), November 7, 2016

Jake Pearson and Jeff Horwitz, Comey honored by group with longtime Trump ties, Associated Press, November 7, 2016

Michael Finnegan, Trump stokes terrorism fears, citing refugee ‘disaster’ in Minnesota, Los Angeles Times, November 6, 2016

Max Ehrenfreund, Something has been going badly wrong in the neighborhoods that support Trump, Washington Post, November 4, 2016

David Barstow, Mike McIntire, Patricia Cohen, Susanne Craig and Russ Buettner, Donald Trump used legally dubious method to avoid paying taxes, New York Times, October 31, 2016

Former Bush ethics lawyer accuses FBI director of violating Hatch Act, Government Executive (Washington, DC). October 31, 2016

Richard W. Painter, On Clinton e-mails, did the FBI director abuse his power?, New York Times, October 30, 2016

Sari Horwitz, Washington Post, Officials warned FBI head about decision on e-mails, Boston Globe, October 29, 2016

Photocopy, Letter to Congress from FBI director on Clinton e-mail case, New York Times, October 28, 2016

Drew Harwell, When Trump goes confrontational, lawyer steps in, Washington Post, October 16, 2016

Victoria Bekiempis, Lawsuit accusing Donald Trump of raping 13-year-old girl gets December hearing, New York Daily News, October 12, 2016

Richard Cohen, Why do Republicans suddenly find Trump repugnant? He looks like a loser, Washington Post, October 8, 2016

Philip Rucker, Trump hopes to revive campaign after tax discovery caps a week of self-sabotage, Washington Post, October 2, 2016

Stephanie McCrummen, Finally: someone who thinks like me, Washington Post, October 1, 2016

Robert O’Harrow, Jr. and Shawn Boburg, The man who showed Donald Trump how to exploit power and instill fear, Washington Post, June 17, 2016

Gabrielle Levy, How Citizens United has changed politics in five years, U.S. News, January 21, 2015

Jane Doe v. Donald J. Trump and Jeffrey E. Epstein (refiled complaint), Case No. 1:16-cv-07673, U.S. District Court for Southern New York, filed September 30, 2016

Thomas F. Meagher, Meagher Emanuel Laks Goldberg & Liao, LLP, Princeton, NJ, September, 2016

Jon Swaine, Rape lawsuits against Donald Trump linked to former TV producer, Guardian (UK), July 7, 2016

Lisa Bloom, Why the new child rape case filed against Donald Trump should not be ignored, Huffington Post, June 29, 2016

Craig Bolon, Hillary Clinton for President, Brookline Beacon, October 8, 2016

Craig Bolon, Chump disease: political virus, Brookline Beacon, October 2, 2016

Craig Bolon, Chump No. 3 sounds like No. 2, Brookline Beacon, June 11, 2016