Category Archives: Elections

Winds of change: limits on marijuana

At the federal and state election of November, 2016, Massachusetts voters approved Question 4 by a 54-46 percent margin, legalizing marijuana for all uses. Opposition concentrated in the middle and outer Boston suburbs and on Cape Cod. Otherwise support spread across the state. Majorities voted Yes in 260 cities and towns with combined population of 4.7 million (72 percent of state population according to the 2010 census). Majorities voted No in 91 communities with combined population of 1.8 million (28 percent).

Voting to legalize marijuana did not mean accepting marijuana as a local business. Over the next year and a half, 156 Massachusetts cities and towns with combined population of 2.7 million (42 percent of state population) enacted moratoriums on marijuana shops. Some communities enacted outright bans, and some also banned or restricted other types of marijuana business. Most moratoriums were set to expire between June 30, 2018, and June 30, 2019.

Despite warnings from the state’s attorney general about enacting a moratorium extending into 2019, eight towns did so: Abington, Mansfield, Douglas, Rochester, Berlin, New Marlborough, New Braintree and Florida (listed by decreasing populations). Majorities in all but Mansfield had voted Yes on Question 4.

Bans on marijuana shops: As of late June, 2018, 76 Massachusetts cities and towns with combined population of 1.4 million (22 percent of the state population) had enacted permanent bans on marijuana shops. Most were communities where majorities of voters had voted No on Question 4. In those communities, town meetings and city councils could enact bans. Elsewhere voters had to approve.

In 18 Massachusetts communities where majorities of voters in a state election had supported Question 4, voters in local elections banned marijuana shops: Milford, Stoughton, Concord, South Hadley, Southbridge, Bellingham, Auburn, Whitman, East Bridgewater, Holliston, Medway, Acushnet, Hull, Southwick, Freetown, Merrimac, Barre and Mount Washington (listed by decreasing populations).

Hazards: Although milder than those produced by cocaine, amphetamines and narcotics, addictions to marijuana are well known. Craving, tolerance, withdrawal symptoms, adverse reactions, cognitive and behavioral impairments and mood disorders tend to increase with frequency and amount of marijuana use. A range of psychological dependence shades into addiction, similar in some ways to dependencies on alcohol and tobacco and to compulsive gambling.

Marijuana users who begin as teenagers or in early adulthood incur risks of lasting harm. As with other addictive regimes, some people are not attracted to marijuana, and some avoid addiction despite exposure. There is controversy over degrees of risk and amounts of harm, and there is currently no reliable way to predict individuals becoming addicted or suffering lasting harm.

Trends and publicity: Rejection of local marijuana business has been notably firm and fairly cohesive among Boston’s middle and outer suburbs. From Boxford and Chelmsford to the northwest, curving through Weston and Northborough to the west, Foxborough and Raynham to the southwest, and Braintree and Duxbury to the southeast, towns banned marijuana shops outright. Some banned all marijuana business.

Those are communities where many live who grew up in the founding high-tech surges. Most such workplaces were located in the suburbs spreading outward from Route 128, so those are also the communities where much of the workforce went. Family values remain strong and upwardly mobile. There is low tolerance for needless risk to sons and daughters from parents who reached success in their careers. As one speaker at a town meeting put it, “We are a community that builds ball fields and parks.”

In contrast, the Boston Globe–New England’s best known news medium–has been patronizing marijuana partisans, often focusing on interests seeking a faster pace of development. Reporter Dan Adams carved out a niche writing items favorable to marijuana interests that rarely mention other outlooks. While there is an occasional contrary view written by someone else, it tends to get lost in the parade for marijuana. Chasing profits instead of candor, Globe managers foster public and reader disservice.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, July 2, 2018


Massachusetts city and town actions on marijuana shops, Brookline Beacon, July, 2018 (notes majorities voting to legalize marijuana or not, via Question 4 in 2016)

Ally Jarmanning and Daigo Fujiwara, Where marijuana stores can and can’t open in Massachusetts, WBUR (Boston, MA), June 28, 2018 (presents data through an interactive map)

Dan Adams, Attorney General Maura Healey’s ruling could slow Massachusetts marijuana industry, Boston Globe, June 25, 2018

Steven Hoffman, Which Massachusetts towns won’t allow marijuana sales?, WBZ (CBS Boston), June 22, 2018 (tabulates data from the Massachusetts Municipal Association)

Timothy Naimi, Why marijuana policies in Massachusetts aren’t strict enough, Boston Globe, June 20, 2018

Dan Adams and Margeaux Sippell, Recreational marijuana companies face bans, moratoriums in cities and towns, Boston Globe, March 17, 2018

Zoe Mathews, North Andover bans commercial marijuana, North Andover (MA) Eagle-Tribune, January 30, 2018

Massachusetts ballot question 4: legalize marijuana, Boston Globe, November 16, 2016 (includes interactive map showing voting by cities and towns)

Massachusetts marijuana legalization, Question 4, Encyclopedia of American Politics (Ballotpedia), November, 2016

Kevin Sabet, Madeline Meier responds to latest IQ and marijuana studies, Smart Approaches to Marijuana (Alexandria, VA), January 19, 2016

Madeline H. Meier, Avshalom Caspi et al., Persistent cannabis users show neuropsychological decline from childhood to midlife, Proceedings of the U.S. National Academies of Science 109(40):E2657-2664, 2012

Alain Dervaux, Cannabis use and dependence, Presse Médicale 41(12):1233-1240, 2012 (in French)

Alan J. Budney, Roger Roffman et al., Marijuana dependence and treatment, Addiction Science and Clinical Practice 4(1):4–16, 2007

Craig Bolon, Marijuana business: trends in Oregon, Brookline Beacon, May 29, 2018

Craig Bolon, Against neighborhoods: Brookline zoning for marijuana, Brookline Beacon, May 12, 2018

Craig Bolon, Medical marijuana in Brookline: will there be a site?, Brookline Beacon, December 7, 2014

Pipeline fiascos: Mass. gas morass

In a brazen money-grab, two big U.S. pipeline companies proposed major new natural-gas pipelines across southern new England a few years ago. At 2.7 Bcf/d (billion cubic feet per day), their combined new capacity would have far exceeded the most aggressive estimate of domestic needs over 30 years, 1.1 Bcf/d.

Thinly disguised motives were to build channels to ship U.S. natural gas overseas as LNG (liquefied natural gas), mainly sent in ocean-going tankers to Europe. Natural gas is a finite and strategic U.S. resource that has greatly reduced emissions of toxic substances and greenhouse gases, as compared with coal-fired power, during our country’s transition to renewable energy.

The pipeline developments were poorly reported in New England. The Boston Globe, the region’s largest news medium, has never employed a competent energy reporter. It has lacked a dedicated reporter on environmental issues since Beth Daley left in 2011 for a Knight fellowship at Stanford, never to return. Its politics reporters are usually clueless about business. Its business reporters pretend to be clueless about politics.

Take the money and run: Greedy, hostile companies trying to ream out New England were Kinder Morgan of Houston, TX–successor to Enron, El Paso Pipeline and Tennessee Gas Pipeline–and Spectra Energy of Houston–successor to Texas Eastern Pipeline and Algonquin Gas Transmission. Spectra recently became a division of Enbridge, a tar-sands pipeline developer located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

The greedy, hostile companies were looking for a cheap date and found one. What could be cheaper than building pipelines with somebody else’s money? At somebody else’s risk? The 2014 Republican candidate for Massachusetts governor became an eager cheerleader. On Election Day, 2014, five Kinder Morgan executives forked over $2,500 to the campaign of Governor-elect Charles Duane Baker, Jr. Senior personnel at other interested companies and groups had kicked in earlier for “Charlie”–as he styled himself.

As Gov. “Charlie” likely knew at the time and surely should have known, the largest electric utilities in New England entertained partnerships with Spectra Energy. Eversource–successor to Boston Edison–and National Grid–successor to Northeast Utilities–considered commitments to Spectra’s “Access Northeast” project: a major, new gas pipeline along the route of the Algonquin pipeline opened in 1953.

Payback to business backers of Gov. “Charlie” was prompt. Angela O’Connor became chair of the Department of Public Utilities (DPU). She was a former president of New England Power Generators Association. Ron Gerwatowski became assistant secretary for energy. He had been a senior vice president at National Grid. Robert Hayden, a DPU lawyer who lost for Congress, running as a reactionary, became DPU commissioner.

Three months after Gov. “Charlie” took office, mastiffs at the Department of Energy Resources proposed to allow electricity distribution companies to invest in natural-gas pipelines, funded by surcharges levied against retail electricity rates. They should have known the proposal violated both letter and spirit of the 1997 Electric Utility Restructuring Act. [St. 1997, C. 164] That law took the distribution companies, including Boston Edison and Northeast Utilities, away from electricity generation they had mismanaged.

Three and a half months later, the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office (AGO) notified the DPU that the proposal in DPU docket 15-37 appeared to violate the Electric Utility Restructuring Act. According to the AGO, the proposal also lacked “ratepayer protections such as competitive processes, transparency, avoidance of conflicts of interest and incentives to achieve the best results for ratepayers.” In other words, it encouraged greedy, hostile companies against which the Electric Utility Restructuring Act had been aimed.

Battling the elements, elements mostly win: An ox set to be gored by would-be money-grabbers was the operator of the Distrigas LNG terminal on the Everett waterfront. Since 1971, that facility has landed natural gas shipped from overseas to fuel what became the largest generating plant in New England. Lower costs for U.S. gas delivered from pipelines shut in three other New England LNG terminals, but the Everett terminal survived through enterprising services and favorable, long-term contracts.

More recently interconnected to major pipelines, the Everett terminal has supplied gas to pipeline customers during winter months when demands peak. Operator GDF Suez, reorganized as Engie in 2015, was incensed to find that Massachusetts might subsidize operations of pipeline competitors through regulated electricity rates and promptly filed a Massachusetts lawsuit: Engie Gas & LNG v. Department of Public Utilities. Other New England energy operators petitioned a federal agency to block similar state subsidy schemes.

Through an amicus filing, the AGO advised the Supreme Judicial Court that DPU support for pipeline subsidies using regulated electricity rates violated the Electric Utility Restructuring Act and went beyond DPU powers under the state’s general laws. The SJC assigned expedited reviews. In a decision of August, 2016, the SJC flatly reversed the DPU, closely following the attorney general’s reasoning.

Seeing that Massachusetts utilities were lining up behind the Specta project, Kinder Morgan had folded its cards before the SJC decision, shelving the “Northeast Energy Direct” project. Less than a year later, finding no customer base to support oversized capacity, Spectra shut down the “Access Northeast” project. Thus the administration of Gov. “Charlie” was left adrift–ready to run but lacking a race track.

Working mostly in the shadows, Gov. “Charlie” continues catering to business allies at the expense of voters and taxpayers. Recently the DPU shut down residential solar energy, again pandering to large utilities that would rather not be bothered with an intermittent, nondispatchable energy source.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, March 6, 2018


Residential solar suffers a major setback from latest DPU decision, Solar Energy Business Association of New England (Amherst, MA), January 12, 2018

Enzo DiMatteo, More banks bailing on tar sands pipelines, Now Magazine (Toronto), November 6, 2017

Herman K. Trabish, Massachusetts utilities take divergent approaches to grid modernization, Utility Dive (Washington, DC), September 6, 2017

Mary C. Serreze, Enbridge suspends Access Northeast natural gas pipeline plan, Springfield (MA) Republican, June 29, 2017

Jon Chesto, Lacking financing, utilities put $3 billion natural gas pipeline plan on hold, Boston Globe, June 29, 2017

Andy Metzger, State House News, Beaton ‘saddened’ by retribution charges as State House inquiry lingers, Worcester (MA) Sun, October 2, 2016

Richa Naidu and Sweta Singh, Enbridge buying Spectra in $28 billion deal, Reuters (UK), September 6, 2016

Lee Hansen, The Massachusetts natural-gas pipeline-expansion proposal, Connecticut General Assembly, August 29, 2016

Eugenia T. Gibbons, DPU approval for pipeline tax sought no more, but Spectra project still very much in the works, Mass. Energy Consumers Alliance (Boston), August 25, 2016

Engie Gas & LNG v. Department of Public Utilities, Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, Case nos. SJC-12051 and SJC-12052, August 17, 2016

Colin A. Young and Katie Lannan, State House News, Gov. Baker signs renewable energy bill, Quincy (MA) Patriot Ledger, August 8, 2016

Jon Chesto. SJC rejects Baker’s plan to impose fee for gas pipelines, Boston Globe, June 29, 2016

William Opalka, Generation owners seek to block EDC-pipeline deals, RTO Insider (Potomac, MD), June 27, 2016

Jon Chesto. Kinder Morgan shelves $3 billion pipeline project, Boston Globe, April 20, 2016

Mary C. Serreze, More than 90 Massachusetts lawmakers oppose ratepayers financing natural gas pipelines, Springfield (MA) Republican, April 11, 2016

Craig Altemose, Gov. Baker’s campaign contributions from energy executives, Huffington Post, April 7, 2016

Mary C. Serreze, Supreme Judicial Court to consider if Massachusetts electric utilities can buy pipeline capacity on behalf of power plants, Springfield (MA) Republican, April 5, 2016

Paul J. Hibbard and Craig P. Aubuchon (Analysis Group, Boston), Power System Reliability in New England, November, 2015 (prepared for Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office)

Rebecca Tapper, Healey slams Baker’s DPU in letter, Commonwealth, September 22, 2015

Craig Altemose, Emerging reality of gas infrastructure: destination export, Huffington Post, July 10, 2015

Initial comments of the attorney general, Department of Public Utilities docket 15-37, June 15, 2015

Shira Schoenberg, Seek to expand state’s natural gas capacity, Baker administration tells Department of Public Utilities, Springfield (MA) Republican, April 14, 2015

Natural gas delivery capacity for thermal load and electric generation, Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities, Docket 15-37 initial filing, April 2, 2015

Brian Dowling, National Grid joins $3 billion New England pipeline buildout, Hartford (CT) Courant, February 18, 2015

Mary C. Serreze, Region needs energy upgrades, including more natural gas pipeline capacity, says grid operator ISO New England, Springfield (MA) Republican, January 26, 2015

David Abel, Baker appoints controversial new energy team, Boston Globe, January 13, 2015

Matt Murphy, State House News, Beaton shakes up DPU team, hires former National Grid exec, Lowell (MA) Sun, January 12, 2015

David Abel, Environmentalists wary of Baker’s energy pick, Boston Globe, November 28, 2014

Shira Schoenberg, State Rep. Matt Beaton appointed energy secretary by Gov.-Elect Charlie Baker, Springfield (MA) Republican, November 17, 2014

Beth Daley, Senior reporter at New England Center for Investigative Reporting, Huffington Post, 2014

Thomas Overton, Everett LNG terminal at the crossroads, Power Magazine, July 2, 2013

An act relative to restructuring the electric utility industry, Massachusetts Acts of 1997, Chapter 164

Craig Bolon, New gas pipelines spurned: no subsidies from electricity rates, Brookline Beacon, August 17, 2016

Craig Bolon, Little need for new gas pipelines, Brookline Beacon, July 20, 2016

Craig Bolon, New England gas pipelines: attorney general weighs in, Brookline Beacon, November 1, 2015

Craig Bolon, New England gas pipelines: need versus greed, Brookline Beacon, August 29, 2015

Reopen the Senate: practice democracy

From the daily news

“U.S. Senators prepared for a potentially rancorous day Tuesday, even by recent standards of partisan rancor, as Democratic leaders threatened to change filibuster rules to stop Republicans from blocking White House nominees for Administration appointments.

“Several votes were scheduled to test whether Republicans will allow simple-majority confirmations of a handful of long-stalled nominations. Some Senators expressed hopes for a breakthrough early Tuesday after none was reached during a rare, three-hour private ‘caucus’ of nearly all Senators Monday night.”

Associated Press reporter Charles Babington was summarizing events during the summer of 2013 that had led to what looked then like a radical proposal.

“If neither side retreats, potential consequences would last for years. A rules change that Majority Leader Harry Reid (D, NV) proposes is limited. It would end the ability of 41 Senators to block action on White House nominations other than judges. The out-of-power party still could use filibusters to block legislation and judicial nominees. Some critics say Reid’s plan would prompt Republicans to retaliate by doing even more to reduce the minority party’s rights when they regain control of the Senate–as early as 2014 elections.”

The struggle four years ago led to the first major write-down of the Senate’s so-called “filibuster” customs–really a gross misnomer. The outcome allowed the Obama administration to confirm key appointments over objections of Senate Republicans. Those included Gina McCarthy to head the Environmental Protection Agency and Richard Cordray to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

As Prof. Sarah Binder recounted in Congressional testimony published by the Brookings Institution, the so-called “filibuster” was not a founding tradition of the U.S. Senate. It is an invention: a legacy of the infamous Aaron Burr, who assassinated Alexander Hamilton, first Secretary of the Treasury, in 1804.

The original, founding Senate members adopted Rule 8 in April, 1789, under which any debate could be curtailed by a motion for the previous question, requiring a majority vote of those present. Mr. Burr urged on the Senate a custom of unlimited debate in his March, 1805, farewell speech as Vice President. The Senate warmed to his unctuous sense of self-importance and removed Rule 8 the following year.

The term “filibuster” was a borrowing. In the middle of the nineteenth century, it meant a rogue military operation or piracy. There was no actual attempt at seizing the Senate floor for unlimited debate until March, 1841, over an issue of replacing the Senate printers.

For the following 76 years the filibuster, although rarely practiced, was an absolute barrier to Senate action. Then Senate Rule 22, the cloture rule, was adopted in 1917, most recently modified in 1975–reducing the vote count from 67 to 60. Although curbed by the 2013 changes, the supermajority threshold of cloture has left the Senate paralyzed on significant issues.

What goes around comes around. There is never an ideal opportunity for major change. If Republicans abolish or choke off Senate filibusters this year, events are likely to favor future Senate Democrats. Historical precedents suggest small chances for the cockroach President to win a second term. He is at least as much disliked as former Pres. Polk (1845-1849) became.

The 2020 elections may install a Democrat as President and return Democrats as the Senate majority. If that were to happen, the gridlock of 2011 through 2013 could return. It was only partly relieved by the change that former Sen. Reid sponsored. The original Rule 8 should be revived.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, March 31, 2017


Mary Clare Jalonick and Erica Werner, Associated Press, Democratic opposition to Trump court pick grows, Schumer warns Republicans, WTOP (Washington, DC), March 31, 2017

Charles Babington, Associated Press, As filibuster talks flag, Senate faces showdown, New York Times, July 16, 2013

Jonathan Weisman, The Senate’s long slide to gridlock, New York Times, November 25, 2012

Sarah Binder, The history of the filibuster, Brookings Institution, 2010

Craig Bolon, Circuses: cheaper than bread, Brookline Beacon, February 21, 2017

Circuses: cheaper than bread

Last fall, the cockroach candidate attacked “people who are registered to vote in more than one state.” At the time, an Associated Press reporter recently discovered, his “voter fraud expert” Gregg Allen Phillips was registered to vote in three states: Alabama, Mississippi and Texas.

A “voter fraud” investigation recently vanished from political radar. Jonathan Lemire of Associated Press quoted Lindsay Walters as saying on February 3 at the White House, “I do not have an update at this time.” The cockroach President had enjoyed no political “honeymoon.” Less than a day after he took office, millions of protesters had begun to march in more than 600 events held world-wide.

This January 21, at least 500,000 demonstrated in Washington, DC, and in Los Angeles, 200,000 in New York City and in Chicago, 150,000 in Boston and many hundreds of thousands in at least 300 other U.S. cities–all together the largest single day of demonstrations in U.S. history. Many more hundreds of thousands demonstrated in London, Paris, Mexico City, Buenos Aries, New Delhi, Sydney, Tokyo and hundreds of other locales on all the continents.

The next day, the New York Times dropped its whining about “fact checking” and “errors”–writing that the new President told a “lie” about supposedly winning the popular vote. That seemed to startle some readers of the Grey Lady, but it likely had no impact on voters who chose this President.

Sewage clerks: Early last year, the Politico organization dispatched three experienced reporters to review the cockroach candidate and check out the sewage. On average, they found a false statement for each five minutes of public contact.

*** “death of Christianity in America”
*** Sen. Rubio “totally in favor of amnesty”
*** taking “no money from donors” [then $7.5 million]
*** we send Japan “nothing” [$62 billion in 2014 imports]
*** owns a “successful winery” [denied by the actual owner]
*** “Made in the USA…not anymore” [$4.4 trillion in 2014]
*** “winning every poll with the Hispanics” [losing in all]

Harry G. Frankfurt, a social philosopher, published a widely quoted essay, On Bullshit, in 1986, when he chaired the Philosophy Department at Yale. It anticipated the cockroach candidate, as Prof. Frankfurt, now retired from Princeton, noted in discussions with reporters last year. That candidate, he said, “provides a robust example of someone who…indulges freely both in lies and in bullshit.”

Reporters and news media, repeatedly smeared by the cockroach President, have begun checking every claim and describing what they find. Associated Press posts a “fact check” summary at least once a week. The New York Times publishes “fact check” stories about public events and news conferences.

*** This administration is running like a fine-tuned machine….
“Trump’s first month has been…missteps and firestorms”

*** I inherited a mess….
“Incomes were rising and the country was adding jobs”

*** ISIS has spread like cancer….
“Islamic State…began to lose ground before Trump took office”

*** The biggest Electoral College win since Ronald Reagan….
“The winners of five…won a larger Electoral College majority”

*** You probably saw the Keystone pipeline I approved….
“He hasn’t approved the Keystone XL pipeline”

– from Associated Press, February 20, 2017

No prior President has been so rampantly and casually dishonest. History offers other salient examples in U.S. politics, notably from campaigns against Communism and drugs. At a party conference in West Virginia held in February of 1950, the late Sen. Joseph McCarthy (R, WI) waved a sheaf of papers that he said named “205…individuals..loyal to the Communist Party” and working in the State Department. After years of filth, smears and lies, McCarthy was eventually censured by the Senate. He died in office, likely from alcoholism.

Present danger: Clear dangers from an unhinged President are war and financial collapse. An unhinged Walker Bush was left a strong economy and a world in tension but not at war. From him we got Iraq, the September 11 hijack attacks that he was warned about a month before and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. It took eight years of an Obama administration to work through the disasters.

The cockroach President has already shown signs of trouble. We need to keep the heat on and be prepared to act when he falters. He has earned no charity. As Kevin Baker noted, writing in the New York Times, “Mr. Trump was exposed enough for any thinking adult to see exactly what he is.”

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, February 21, 2017


Jim Drinkard and Calvin Woodward, AP fact check: Trump’s view at odds with events of the week, Associated Press, February 20, 2017

Linda Qiu, Fact check: what Trump got wrong at his rally, New York Times, February 18, 2017

Charles J. Symes, Why nobody cares the President is lying, New York Times, February 4, 2017

Jonathan Lemire, Trump executive order on voter fraud quietly stalled, Associated Press, February 3, 2017

Garance Burke, Trump’s voter fraud expert registered in 3 states, Associated Press, January 30, 2017

Michael D. Shear and Emmarie Huetteman, Trump repeats lie about popular vote in meeting with lawmakers, New York Times, January 23, 2017

Kevin Baker, The America we lost when Trump won, New York Times, January 21, 2017

Nika Knight, On first full day as President, Trump attacks the press, Common Dreams (Portland, ME), January 21, 2017

Robert King, Trump says it’s OK if ‘rigged’ voters vote for him, Washington (DC) Examiner, October 22, 2016

David Greenberg, Are Clinton and Trump the biggest liars ever to run for President?, Politico Magazine, July, 2016

Harry G. Frankfurt, Donald Trump is BS, Time, May 12, 2016

Daniel Lippman, Darren Samuelsohn and Isaac Arnsdorf, Trump’s week of errors, exaggerations and flat-out falsehoods, Politico, March 13, 2016

Harry G. Frankfurt, On Bullshit, Raritan Quarterly Review (Rutgers, New Brunswick, NJ) 6(2):81-100, 1986

Craig Bolon, Second day: millions protest, Brookline Beacon, January 22, 2017

Second day: millions protest

The day after the recent inauguration of a new President, millions of protesters marched in more than 600 events held world-wide. The protest in Washington, DC, drew about three to five times the numbers at the inauguration, by different estimates. It may have been the largest demonstration ever held there, rivaling the 1969 protest against the Vietnam War.

At least 500,000 demonstrated in Washington and in Los Angeles, 200,000 in New York and in Chicago, 150,000 in Boston and many hundreds of thousands in at least 300 other U.S. cities–all together the largest single day of demonstrations in U.S. history. Many more hundreds of thousands demonstrated in London, Paris, Buenos Aries, Mexico City, New Delhi, Sydney and hundreds of other locales on all the continents.

Despite its enormous scale, the Washington, DC, protest did not result in arrests. No major incidents were reported from any of the other U.S. events. Protesters called for respecting women’s rights and civil rights and for promoting friendship. “Love Trumps Hate” was a common theme–mocking the sexist, racist, hate-filled campaign conducted by last year’s winning candidate.

True to form: The recently installed President, who campaigned like a sleazebag, began governing like a jerk. His first full day in office sounded like a two-year-old’s tantrum. According to Julie Pace of Associated Press:

“[With] a memorial to fallen CIA agents…as the backdrop, [Trump claimed that] journalists are ‘the most dishonest human beings on Earth.’ Looking out at an audience of men and women who have played a direct role in the nation’s wars against terrorism, Trump said, ‘I have a running war with the media.’ High-level CIA leaders stood silently as the commander-in-chief unleashed his off-topic attacks….”

John O. Brennan, the outgoing CIA director, called out the incident, saying he was “deeply saddened and angered” at the remarks. According to a wire-service report based on interviews with participants, “Many people felt used and awkward.”

The new President has nominated a rigidly reactionary slate of appointees and touted a hostile, insulting approach to government. He has gone far outside conservatism into a cult of personality. For better or worse, he has already ignited flames of conflict within his administration and with Congress.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, January 22, 2017


Alanna Durkin Richer, Tami Abdollah, Juliet Linderman, Brian Witte, Matthew Barakat and David Dishneau, Associated Press, Defiant women to Trump: your agenda won’t go unchallenged, Action News (Pittsburgh, PA), January 22, 2017

Colin Dwyer, Maggie Penman, Mandalit del Barco and Frank Langfitt, Women’s Marches go global: postcards from protests around the world, (U.S.) National Public Radio, January 21, 2017

Jason Easley, Women’s March is the biggest protest in U.S. history as an estimated 2.9 million march, Politicus USA (Los Angeles), January 21, 2017

Timothy B. Lee, Aerial photos show large crowds at Women’s Marches across the country, Vox (New York City), January 21, 2017

John Wright, DC Metro reports second busiest day in history for Women’s March, behind Obama inauguration. NCRM News (Washington, DC), January 22, 2017

Associated Press, More than 1 million trips taken on DC rail system for Women’s March, Action News (Pittsburgh, PA), January 22, 2017

Jessica Rice and Heather Navarro, 750 thousand flock to downtown LA for Women’s March, NBC Los Angeles, January 21, 2017

Evan Allen, Eric Moskowitz, Laura Crimaldi, Patricia Wen and Nicole Fleming, Boston rally draws up to 175,000, officials say, Boston Globe, January 21, 2017

Julie Pace, Associated Press, Trump promises big change but picks small fights, WTOP (Washington, DC), January 22, 2017

Jonathan Lemire and Jill Colvin, Trump uses bogus claim to knock media on reports, Associated Press, January 22, 2017

Ryan Browne, Former CIA chief Brennan bashes Trump over speech during CIA visit, Cable Network News, January 22, 3017

Jonathan Martin, Inaugural speech dims GOP hopes for a more conservative Trump agenda, New York Times, January 21, 2017

Doina Chiacu and Jason Lange, White House vows to fight media ‘tooth and nail’ over Trump coverage, Reuters (UK), January 22, 2017

Peter Baker, Glenn Thrush and Maggie Haberman, Rocky first weekend for Trump troubling top aides, New York Times, January 22, 2017

Elections in 2016: trends from Massachusetts cities and towns

In 2016 general elections, Massachusetts voters extended a record of support for progressive causes and candidates. Voters strongly supported Clinton and Kaine for President and Vice President, and they returned a delegation of mostly progressive Democrats to Congress. On four statewide ballot questions, voters opposed another slot-machine casino, opposed lifting limits on charter schools, favored protective measures for farm animals and annulled former state laws against marijuana use and sale.

Votes for President and Vice President: Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine won majorities in 257 Massachusetts cities and towns, losing in 94 of them. Populations in the cities and towns that Clinton won ranged up to 618 thousand (Boston), averaging 22 thousand. Populations in the cities and towns that she lost ranged up to 41 thousand (Westfield), averaging 10 thousand. Opposition came mostly from small towns. The ten communities with the strongest opposition were Blandford, Chester, Douglas, East Brookfield, Granville, Holland, North Brookfield, Russell, Southwick and Tolland–all with populations of less than 10 thousand.

Clinton support for President in Massachusetts

clintonsupportquintiles2016
Source: Secretary of the Commonwealth, preliminary

Source: American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Contrary to speculation that higher-income communities were more likely to support Clinton and Kaine, the votes of Massachusetts communities did not show a clear trend of that type. Instead, communities with larger populations voted more strongly for Clinton and Kaine. When Massachusetts communities were divided into quintiles according to support for Clinton, with quintile 1 the strongest support, there was a clear, uniform trend of increasing support with increasing community population.

Votes on charter schools: Sponsors of Question 2, trying to abolish limits on charter schools, spent $24 million. At around $20 for every vote they attracted, it was by far the most costly campaign ever on a ballot question. They won majorities in only 15 of the 351 Massachusetts cities and towns.

Under current laws and regulations, up to 120 charter schools are allowed statewide. Six cities have reached their local limits: Boston, Holyoke, Lawrence, Lowell, Springfield and Worchester. As of November, 2016, 88 charter schools had been designated in Massachusetts, located in 36 communities–one school in each of the following communities except as noted:

Adams, Boston (27), Cambridge (3), Chelsea (2), Chicopee, Devens, Easthampton, Everett, Fall River (3), Fitchburg, Foxborough, Framingham, Franklin, Greenfield, Hadley, Harwich, Haverhill, Holyoke (2), Hyannis (2), Lawrence (8), Lowell (3), Lynn, Marblehead, Marlborough, New Bedford (3), Newburyport, Norwell, Plymouth (2), Salem, Saugus, Somerville (2), South Hadley, Springfield (6), Tyngsboro, West Tisbury and Worcester (2).

No Massachusetts community that has a charter school supported Question 2. No city in the state and no town with a population over 28 thousand supported Question 2. Instead, high household incomes correlated with support for Question 2. When Massachusetts communities were divided into quintiles according to support for Question 2, with quintile 1 the strongest support, there was a clear, uniform trend of increasing support with increasing household income.

Support for Question 2 in Massachusetts

question2supportquintiles2016
Source: Secretary of the Commonwealth, preliminary

Source: American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

The ten communities voting the strongest support for Question 2 were Aquinnah (on Martha’s Vineyard), Chilmark, Dover, Gosnold, Lincoln, Manchester-by-the-Sea, Nantucket, Sherborn, Wellesley and Weston. They include four of the six highest-income Massachusetts towns: Sherborn, Wellesley, Carlisle, Sudbury, Dover and Weston. None of the Massachusetts communities that supported Question 2 has a charter school.

Meanings of trends: Measured trends of support for Clinton and for Question 2 run cross-current to some popular political lore. In a graphical analysis, New York Times writers speculated that lower-income voters turned against Clinton, while higher-income voters did the reverse. Results from Massachusetts communities show no clear trend connected with incomes but instead show a trend involving sizes of the communities where voters live. The more urbanized voters tended to support Clinton.

In contrast, results for Question 2 from Massachusetts communities do show a clear trend connected with household incomes. Sponsors of Question 2 and their apologists claimed that the charter schools are hugely popular with low-income households. If that were true, then there might have been a trend linking stronger support for Question 2 with lower household incomes. However, the actual trend from Massachusetts communities went in the opposite direction.

Promotions for Question 2 appeared to have sophisticated authors, but perhaps the sponsors of Question 2 fooled themselves about the appeal of their products. Bystanders in communities hosting charter schools are much more numerous than participants–a factor that sponsors of Question 2 might not have weighed accurately.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, December 22, 2016


Massachusetts 2016 election results by cities and towns, plus demographics, Brookline Beacon, December, 2016

Massachusetts elections statistics, Secretary of the Commonwealth, December, 2016

American Community Survey, U.S Census Bureau, 2009-2013 ACS 5-year data release

Names and locations of charter schools, Massachusetts Charter Public School Association, December, 2016

Robert Weintraub, Massachusetts should vote No on more charter schools, BU Today (Boston, MA), October 17, 2016

Michael Altman, Charter schools: an issue of civil rights, WGBH (Boston, MA), October 25, 2016

Paul Crookston, Massachusetts charter school measure backed by Republicans, National Review, October 27, 2016

Editorial, Vote Yes on Question 2, Boston Globe, October 29, 2016

Jim Hand, White House says Obama neutral on charter schools ballot question, Attleboro (MA) Sun Chronicle, October 31, 2016

Editorial, Vote Yes on Question 2, Harvard Crimson (Cambridge, MA), November 3, 2016

Katharine Q. Seelye and Jess Bidgood, Charter schools are the big issue on Massachusetts ballot, New York Times, November 6, 2016

Felicia Gans, Donors spent big on Massachusetts ballot questions, Lowell (MA) Sun, November 7, 2016

K.K. Rebecca Lai, Alicia Parlapiano, Julia Preston and Karen Yourish, How Trump won the election according to exit polls, New York Times, November 8, 2016

Phil Demers, Fiercest Question 2 opponents often from communities with existing charter schools, Springfield (MA) Republican, November 13, 2016

Joan Vennochi, With Question 2 defeat, voters ignored the elites, Boston Globe, November 14, 2016

Samantha Winslow, Massachusetts teachers defeat charter school expansion, In These Times, November 14, 2016

Frank Phillips, Moody’s calls charter school rejection credit positive, Boston Globe, November 16, 2016

Lisa Guisbond, People power trounces big, dark money, as charter expansion suffers decisive defeat, Network for Public Eduction (Kew Gardens, NY), November 21, 2016

Dan French and Diana Lebeaux, Question 2 was defeated: now what?, Center for Collaborative Education (Boston, MA), November 21, 2016

Obama’s legacy: tracking hate crimes

Electing an African-American as U.S. President in 2008 capped centuries of bigotry and began a legacy of inclusion. An image of Obama taking the oath of office became a picture worth a billion words. Despite all the flapping from Europe and Asia about peace and tolerance, so far nothing comparable happened there. For example, there has been no Franco-Arab president of France–not even someone mentioned or on the horizon.

A quiet message, the obverse of promoting inclusion, was delegitimizing racial and ethnic hate. From growing up with bigotry, signs are easily remembered–serving as sly handshakes through words and acts that signal shared outlooks: “one of the gang.” Electing a black President, then re-electing him to another term said, “No, that’s not OK any more. That’s not us.”

Lynching and race riots grew in the aftermath of the Civil War and continued into the 1940s. The way of inclusion became an official outlook through the Great Depression, the era of World War II and the landmark Brown v. Board decision from the Supreme Court in 1954. That did not make it the common way of life. Hate crimes against African-Americans surged during civil rights struggles of the 1950s through the 1970s.

Tracking hate crimes: The U.S. Department of Justice finally began to record hate crimes in 1992, as required by the Hate Crime Statistics Act of 1990 and the Arson Prevention Act of 1996. [Public Laws 101-275 and 104-155] About 17,000 law enforcement agencies now contribute to annual reports. Records since 1996 are available online as part of Uniform Crime Reports compiled by FBI central offices. However, the Justice Department does not publish trends and has not tried to provide consistent reporting.

Anti-African-American hate crimes

usantiblackhatecrimes2009thru2015
Source: U.S. Department of Justice, 2016

Data from the U.S. Department of Justice show that the most numerous reported hate crimes target African-Americans, Jews and Muslims. For 2015, recent hate crime data show about 1,750 incidents targeting African-Americans, about 660 targeting Jews and about 260 targeting Muslims.

Anti-Jewish hate crimes

usantijewishhatecrimes2009thru2015
Source: U.S. Department of Justice, 2016

The most recent U.S. population survey for race and ethnicity estimates 43 million African-Americans. The most recent survey for religion estimates about 6 million Jews and 3 million Muslims. Proportionately, the 2015 rates of hate crimes per million residents were about 40 targeting African-Americans, 110 targeting Jews and 90 targeting Muslims.

Anti-Muslim hate crimes

usantimuslimhatecrimes2009thru2015
Source: U.S. Department of Justice, 2016

Crime trends: Hate crime statistics reflect crime motives as reported by law enforcement agencies–not as determined by courts or as found by other third parties. They are affected by reporting bias. If, for example, law-enforcement training increased likelihoods that incidents were flagged as hate crimes, then rates of reported hate crimes would rise, but such increases would reflect training rather than changes in crime rates.

The falling rates of reported hate crimes targeting African-Americans, down about 20 percent for the five years from 2010 to 2015, signal apparent progress during core years of the Obama administration. There was similar apparent progress in lower rates of reported hate crimes targeting Jews, falling about 25 percent over that five-year span.

However, reported hate crimes targeting Muslims increased significantly, about 60 percent over those years. All of that increase occurred during the final year, 2015. Not shown in the foregoing charts, a sustained and even greater increase occurred in reported hate crimes targeting Native Americans. They tripled between 2010 and 2013, then remained nearly steady at the increased rate.

Situations of Native Americans might be so different from those of other groups for reported rates to be largely fictions. On the basis of hundreds of interviews, Barbara Perry, a professor of criminology at the Ontario Institute of Technology, estimated in 2008 that hate crimes targeting Native Americans had been drastically under-reported. A sharp rise in reported rates between 2010 and 2013 could stem from reporting improvements during the Obama administration. Ken Salazar, Interior secretary during those years, promoted policies of inclusion toward Native Americans. So far no systematic survey has addressed the issues.

Causes and consequences: Filth spread by Donald J. Trump’s campaign for President acted to relegitimize and encourage racist behavior, starting in 2015. Trump did not need to “be” a racist or an anti-Semite but just to become a fellow traveler. His race-baiting dog whistles drew poisonous support from Nazi, Klan and other white supremacist groups. He circulated some of their propaganda. There is an obvious precedent. Former President Wilson also drew support from racist groups. The first Southerner elected since Taylor in 1848, he resegregated parts of the federal workforce, notably the Post Office.

Just as Wilson’s attitude and behavior encouraged lynching and growth of the Ku Klux Klan, vile propaganda emerging around the Trump campaign probably encouraged recent hate crimes–notably against Muslims, whom Trump savaged. People with antisocial outlooks and violent bents are apt to find signs of acceptance and perhaps approval. Unless Donald J. Trump were somehow to reverse his ways and become a beacon of tolerance, we can expect a parade of moral cretins and their crimes to surge in future years.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, November 18, 2016


Errin Haines Whack, Associated Press, Trump’s staff picks alarm minorities: ‘injustice to America’, U.S. News, November 18, 2016

Hate crime statistics for 2015, U.S. Department of Justice, November 11, 2016

Adrian Walker, The politics of hatred and resentment seem headed for defeat, Boston Globe, November 7, 2016

Dana Milbank, Anti-Semitism is no longer an undertone of Trump’s campaign. It’s the melody, Washington Post, November 7, 2016

Trump closes his campaign as he opened it: preaching xenophobia and hate, Daily Kos (UK), November 7, 2016

Michael Finnegan, Trump stokes terrorism fears, citing refugee ‘disaster’ in Minnesota, Los Angeles Times, November 6, 2016

Sarah Posner and David Neiwert, How Trump took hate groups mainstream, Mother Jones, October 14, 2016

Stephanie McCrummen, Finally: someone who thinks like me, Washington Post, October 1, 2016

Daniel Marans, Meet members of Donald Trump’s white supremacist fan club, Huffington Post, August 25, 2015

Martin Pengelly, American Nazi Party leader sees ‘a real opportunity’ with a Trump Presidency, Manchester Guardian (UK), August 7, 2016

Emily Flitter, Reuters, Trump tweet that blasts Clinton as corrupt includes the Star of David, Washington Post, July 2, 2016

Tom Shoop, When Woodrow Wilson segregated the federal workforce, Government Executive (Washington, DC), November 20, 2015

William Keylor, The long-forgotten racial attitudes and policies of Woodrow Wilson, Boston University Office of Public Relations, March 4, 2013

Population statistics, Bureau of the Census, U.S. Department of Commerce, 2016

Gregory Smith, et al., America’s changing religious landscape, Pew Research Center, 2015

Barbara Perry, Silent Victims: Hate Crimes Against Native Americans, University of Arizona Press, 2008

Brown v. Board of Education, Leadership Conference (Washington, DC), 2004

Robert A. Gibson, The Negro Holocaust: Lynching and Race Riots in the United States, Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute, 1979

Craig Bolon, Election aftermath: recovery starting, work pending, Brookline Beacon, November 9, 2016

Craig Bolon, Chump disease: political virus, Brookline Beacon, October 2, 2016

Election aftermath: recovery starting, work pending

In a column titled, “Politics of hatred and resentment seem headed for defeat,” Adrian Walker, a writer at the Boston Globe, claimed that the 2016 election involved “the ugliest and strangest Presidential campaign of modern times.” Actually, this year was neither notably ugly nor notably strange for a campaign, either in “modern times” or in historical ones.

The 1968 contest was vile–at the nadir of the Vietnam War–leaving the socially conscious voters without a general-election candidate to support. The main alternative to the pro-war candidates from both major parties was George Wallace, a coarse, violently racist former governor of Alabama who got about 14 percent of the votes. However, early and middle nineteenth century–in the era of slavery–saw far more vicious campaigns than that.

Instead of such modern and historical extremes, this year there was simply one notably ugly Presidential candidate. To our vexation, he won. At best, a Long Night of Nixon–like the one starting in 1968–begins again. We have a President-elect whose lack of character has not been seen since Buchanan in 1856 and Polk in 1844–and whose lack of competence and stature has never been seen before.

To the last day of the campaign, Hillary Clinton’s message remained inclusive: “Stronger together.” Donald J. Trump’s message remained divisive: “Crooked Hillary.” Clinton closed her campaign with rallies featuring President Obama, his wife Michelle, the Clinton family, prominent entertainers and other major figures from politics. Trump closed his campaign much as he had opened it, largely isolated, spouting lies and hate.

The outcome from the 2016 election for President exhibited classic racial voting, strongly coupled to sexist bias. Over 24,500 exit poll responses were reported by Edison Research to the Associated Press, television news networks and the New York Times–made available online by Cable Network News–from which the following table shows a small but telling example, extracted and rearranged for readability. Majorities of both white men and white women voted for Donald J. Trump. Majorities of all other groups voted for Hillary Clinton.


Voting for President in 2016 by race and age
 
Race.and.age..(Pct)….Clinton….Trump…..Other
Whites.18-29.(12%)…….43%…….48%……..9%
Whites.30-44.(17%)…….37%…….55%……..8%
Whites.45-64.(30%)…….34%…….63%……..3%
Whites.65-up.(13%)…….39%…….58%……..3%
Blacks.18-29…(3%)…….83%………9%………8%
Blacks.30-44…(4%)…….87%………7%………6%
Blacks.45-64…(5%)…….90%………9%………1%
Blacks.65.up…(1%)…….90%………9%………1%
Latino.18-29…(2%)…….70%…….24%………6%
Latino.30-44…(3%)…….71%…….22%………7%
Latino.45-64…(3%)…….67%…….29%………4%
Latino.65-up…(1%)…….71%…….24%………5%
Others.18-up…(6%)…….60%…….34%………6%
 
Source: Edison Research via Cable News Network

Chump disease: For readers who followed Donald J. Trump over a career of around 50 years in real estate, he was not strange at all–just greedy and vulgar. Some might remember an arrogant young man, a mediocre new college grad who apparently could not land a real job on his own. Instead, he went to work for his dad, helping to rent out his dad’s apartments.

His first brush with government proved chilling; it foreshadowed his career path. In 1973, he was accused of refusing to rent apartments to African-Americans–a violation of the federal Fair Housing Act of 1970. Instead of mending his ways, Donald J. Trump employed Roy Cohn–a former hired gun for Richard Nixon and J. Edgar Hoover. That attack strategy failed; Trump was forced into a settlement agreement. However, attack strategies settled into Trump’s character; he became known as a business bully.

After a fatuous tangle with casino properties in Atlantic City, Donald J. Trump courted ruin as mismanaged properties lurched to bankruptcy, following the sharp recession of 1991. Facing competition from Connecticut he could not counter, he chiseled his way out by loading losses onto lenders, investors and contractors and avoiding taxes, counting some of their losses as though they had been his losses. Then he discovered a second calling as a media rube. He became known as a sick hustler.

Pending work: There would have been tons of work for a Hillary Clinton administration–starting with investigation of FBI director James Brien “Jim” Comey, Jr.–who in effect acted as a Trump booster while a government employee. Comey’s stunts threw the election. Polling trends up to the stunt on October 28 showed clearly that Hillary Clinton would otherwise have won. One-percent margins in Pennsylvania and Florida, for example, would have landed in the other direction.

Nevertheless, on election day there remained severe problems to solve in domestic programs, notably in Health and Human Services, Education, Interior and Transportation. Chronic Congressional paralysis would likely have taken far more effort than executive agencies, because it springs from voter choices for members of Congress. Most and maybe all that work will probably wait at least another four years, unless Donald J. Trump were to stumble enough to be impeached and convicted.

If nothing more, the effects from Donald J. Trump’s dog-whistle rants showed large segments of U.S. voters may be happy to back candidates who come across as sleazebags, xenophobes, anti-Semites, sexists, racists, Nazi fellow-travelers, political whores and traitors. A recent Washington Post headline put it, “Finally: someone who thinks like me.” Were Trump cheerleaders off their rockers? A more recent Post article cited evidence suggesting many of them were over their heads in debt.

This year, millions of U.S. citizens have been denied a right to vote. David Leonhardt, writing in the New York Times, argued that systematic efforts by reactionary Republicans to swing elections in their favor are the main causes. Corruption is rankest in the Deep South and the Southwest. It also threatens voters in parts of the Midwest. Some of the arrogant rubes behind it Trumpet their motives. Leonhardt quoted one from North Carolina claiming that throttling early voting was “in the best interest of the Republican Party.”

We do not know what Hillary Clinton might have promised high-income sponsors who put up most of around $1 billion she was able to attract in support of her campaign. An early promise by Donald J. Trump to “self fund” his campaign turned out to be just another casual lie from him. Despite the threats emerging from the Citizens United case in 2013, big money–including early big money–proved less effective than many feared it would be. Former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida had the most early big money, yet he was an early loser.

New business: A new item of business–so far skipped by most mainstream media in the United States–is a federal lawsuit against Donald J. Trump. It was filed on September 30, 2016, in the District of Southern New York. It accuses him and an alleged collaborator of child rapes and murder threats. Trump, the co-defendant and their lawyers have sought to dismiss accusations as lies and smears. Jon Swaine, a reporter for the Guardian in Britain, treated an earlier version of the lawsuit as a media circus.

In the recent federal lawsuit, Donald J. Trump and Jeffrey E. Epstein, of New York, are accused of raping a 13-year-old girl in 1994, and both are accused of threatening to have her whole family killed if the girl were to “say anything” about it. With the filings in federal court, the lawsuit seeks to override statutes of limitation. Thomas Meagher of Princeton, New Jersey, the attorney of record, is a patent lawyer–his firm’s chief litigator and managing partner when the recent federal lawsuit was filed.

According to an Internet news article published this past summer, Donald J. Trump’s co-defendant Jeffrey E. Epstein has been classified in New York as “a Level 3 registered sex offender–the most dangerous kind.” The author of that article is a lawyer in California who focuses on tort and divorce cases and who has identified herself as assisting the plaintiff in the recent federal lawsuit.

In an exhibit filed with the complaint against Donald J. Trump, the plaintiff provided a sworn statement saying that “Defendant Trump tied me to a bed,…and then proceeded to forcibly rape me…violently striking me in the face with his open hand and screaming that he would do whatever he wanted.” She further states, “Immediately following this rape, Defendant Trump threatened me that, were I ever to reveal any of the details of Defendant Trump’s sexual and physical abuse of me, my family and I would be physically harmed if not killed.”

Unusual with incidents of violent sexual abuse, the complaint against Donald J. Trump in the lawsuit also provided a sworn statement from a claimed eyewitness to the alleged rapes. It states that she “personally witnessed the Plaintiff being forced to perform various sexual acts with Donald J. Trump and Mr. Epstein. Both Mr. Trump and Mr. Epstein were advised that she was 13 years old.” It further states the claimed eyewitness “personally witnessed Mr. Trump…[and]…Mr. Epstein physically threaten the life and well-being of the Plaintiff if she ever revealed any details of the physical and sexual abuse….”

Donald J. Trump and the co-defendant are presumed innocent unless proven to be at fault. According to the New York Daily News, the next step in the recent federal lawsuit is a court conference set for December 16. One might suspect, however, that a difficult case–now against a President-elect–could be withdrawn.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, November 9, 2016


Note: As was obvious to us on November 8, election day, by November 12 the Hillary Clinton campaign also found that the publicity stunt on October 28 by James Brien “Jim” Comey, Jr., the FBI director, had thrown the election–wrecking the growing Clinton advantage seen in earlier polls. Comey rehashed Clinton’s use of a private e-mail server while Secretary of State, in a letter sent to eight Congressional committee chairs–all Republicans. That was immediately forwarded to news organizations from one or more of those offices. Starting the next day, polls showed declining margins of support for Clinton. By election day, margins had not recovered.

Comey’s FBI staff in New York had found there was an e-mail cache on a computer seized from ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner, the estranged husband of Huma Abedin, a key assistant to Hillary Clinton. As of October 28, the FBI did not have a search warrant to examine the computer and could not legally have known the content of e-mails stored on it. Longstanding Department of Justice policy forbids disclosure of information close to elections, and Comey had recently been reminded about that policy.

News stories soon surfaced that Comey’s October 28 stunt had been engineered by FBI staff in New York City and disclosed to Rudy Giuliani, the former city mayor who had become a key backer of Donald J. Trump. For several days before October 28, in comment sections of major news sites, well known Trump trolls had been feverishly writing comments seeking to persuade readers not to use early voting and suggesting that some major news was in the works. On November 7, Comey was celebrated at an event held by a group of longstanding Trump supporters. [note added November 13, 2016]

Anne Gearan, Washington Post, Hillary Clinton blames Comey letter for stopping her momentum, Boston Globe, November 12, 2016

K.K. Rebecca Lai, Alicia Parlapiano, Jeremy White and Karen Yourish, How Trump won the election according to exit polls, New York Times, November 9, 2016 (updated, with charts)

David Leonhardt, The real voter fraud, New York Times, November 8, 2016

Adrian Walker, The politics of hatred and resentment seem headed for defeat, Boston Globe, November 7, 2016

Dana Milbank, Anti-Semitism is no longer an undertone of Trump’s campaign. It’s the melody, Washington Post, November 7, 2016

Josh Lederman, Associated Press, As campaign closes, the Obamas pass the torch to Clinton, U.S. News, November 7, 2016

Trump closes his campaign as he opened it: preaching xenophobia and hate, Daily Kos (UK), November 7, 2016

Jake Pearson and Jeff Horwitz, Comey honored by group with longtime Trump ties, Associated Press, November 7, 2016

Michael Finnegan, Trump stokes terrorism fears, citing refugee ‘disaster’ in Minnesota, Los Angeles Times, November 6, 2016

Max Ehrenfreund, Something has been going badly wrong in the neighborhoods that support Trump, Washington Post, November 4, 2016

David Barstow, Mike McIntire, Patricia Cohen, Susanne Craig and Russ Buettner, Donald Trump used legally dubious method to avoid paying taxes, New York Times, October 31, 2016

Former Bush ethics lawyer accuses FBI director of violating Hatch Act, Government Executive (Washington, DC). October 31, 2016

Richard W. Painter, On Clinton e-mails, did the FBI director abuse his power?, New York Times, October 30, 2016

Sari Horwitz, Washington Post, Officials warned FBI head about decision on e-mails, Boston Globe, October 29, 2016

Photocopy, Letter to Congress from FBI director on Clinton e-mail case, New York Times, October 28, 2016

Drew Harwell, When Trump goes confrontational, lawyer steps in, Washington Post, October 16, 2016

Victoria Bekiempis, Lawsuit accusing Donald Trump of raping 13-year-old girl gets December hearing, New York Daily News, October 12, 2016

Richard Cohen, Why do Republicans suddenly find Trump repugnant? He looks like a loser, Washington Post, October 8, 2016

Philip Rucker, Trump hopes to revive campaign after tax discovery caps a week of self-sabotage, Washington Post, October 2, 2016

Stephanie McCrummen, Finally: someone who thinks like me, Washington Post, October 1, 2016

Robert O’Harrow, Jr. and Shawn Boburg, The man who showed Donald Trump how to exploit power and instill fear, Washington Post, June 17, 2016

Gabrielle Levy, How Citizens United has changed politics in five years, U.S. News, January 21, 2015

Jane Doe v. Donald J. Trump and Jeffrey E. Epstein (refiled complaint), Case No. 1:16-cv-07673, U.S. District Court for Southern New York, filed September 30, 2016

Thomas F. Meagher, Meagher Emanuel Laks Goldberg & Liao, LLP, Princeton, NJ, September, 2016

Jon Swaine, Rape lawsuits against Donald Trump linked to former TV producer, Guardian (UK), July 7, 2016

Lisa Bloom, Why the new child rape case filed against Donald Trump should not be ignored, Huffington Post, June 29, 2016

Craig Bolon, Hillary Clinton for President, Brookline Beacon, October 8, 2016

Craig Bolon, Chump disease: political virus, Brookline Beacon, October 2, 2016

Craig Bolon, Chump No. 3 sounds like No. 2, Brookline Beacon, June 11, 2016

Early voting: strong service in Brookline

Brookline is providing fairly strong service for early voting in 2016 federal and state elections. There are three Brookline sites and 11 days of early voting operations. On several days, extra service is provided outside 8am-5pm weekday working hours. There are also two days of accepting absentee ballots at Town Hall: November 5 and 7.

Town Hall, first floor
333 Washington St–108 hours
Mon, Oct 24, 8 am-5 pm
Tue, Oct 25, 8 am-5 pm
Wed, Oct 26, 8 am-5 pm
Thu, Oct 27, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)
Fri, Oct 28, 8 am-5 pm
Sat, Oct 29, 9 am-5 pm (8 extra)
Mon, Oct 31, 8 am-5 pm
Tue, Nov 1, 8 am-5 pm
Wed, Nov 2, 8 am-5 pm
Thu, Nov 3, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)
Fri, Nov 4, 8 am-5 pm
Sat, Nov 5, 9 am-5 pm (absentee)
Mon, Nov 7, 8 am-12 noon (absentee)

Sussman House Community Room
50 Pleasant St–32 hours
Tue, Oct 25, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)
Sat, Oct 29, 9 am-5 pm (8 extra)
Tue, Nov 1, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)

Putterham Golf Course Clubhouse
1281 W Roxbury Pkwy–76 hours
Mon, Oct 24, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)
Tue, Oct 25, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)
Wed, Oct 26, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)
Mon, Oct 31, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)
Tue, Nov 1, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)
Wed, Nov 2, 8 am-8 pm (3 extra)

Sussman House, near Coolidge Corner, is convenient to around 40 percent of the town’s residents and gets 32 hours, while the Putterham Golf Course is convenient to less than 10 percent of residents and gets 76 hours. Of 216 total early voting hours, only 46 extra hours are outside 8am-5pm weekday working hours.

Election day polls are Tuesday, November 8, for 13 hours–7am-8pm, at locations in the 16 precincts–for 208 poll hours. Of those, 64 poll hours are outside 8am-5pm weekday working hours. Early voting service for this year will double total poll hours and increase extra hours outside 8am-5pm weekday working hours by about 70 percent.

– Beacon staff, Brookline, MA, October 24, 2016


Early voting sites and hours, Brookline, MA, Town Clerk, October, 2016

Craig Bolon, Hillary Clinton for President, Brookline Beacon, October 8, 2016

Hillary Clinton for President

Despite reservations, we support Hillary Clinton. Like former Senator and current Secretary Kerry, former Senator and Secretary Clinton might lean toward aggression as a Cabinet officer. As President, she will own the outcomes. Like President Obama, she is much more likely to resist rather than promote foreign adventures.

With a second President Clinton, we can expect to sustain progressive programs from the last two Democratic administrations. We can expect strong opposition to scams left from the last Republican one, such as its attempts to sell out national assets and shutter pollution regulation.

There is a major lapse in judgment waiting to be corrected: a quagmire left from launching the Affordable Care programs without any Republican support and without sound financial plans. Few national figures have more experience with the topic than Hillary Clinton.

The two candidates from small parties offer nothing comparable. When at his best, the Republican candidate is a sick joke. His hero is Richard Nixon, the only President to resign the office and the historical promoter of racism that now pervades the Republican Party.

Hillary Clinton is well qualified to serve as President. She deserves our support.

– Craig Bolon, Brookline, MA, October 8, 2016


Editorial, Hillary Clinton for President, Boston Globe, October 8, 2016

Richard Cohen, Why do Republicans suddenly find Trump repugnant? He looks like a loser, Washington Post, October 8, 2016

Patrick Healy and Alan Rappeport, Tape reveals Donald Trump bragging about groping women, New York Times, October 7, 2016

Editorial, Hillary Clinton for President, New York Times, September 25, 2016

Craig Bolon, Chump disease: political virus, Brookline Beacon, October 2, 2016